African American Artists of the 1930s, Wright and Curry Essay by Mark Robertson

African American Artists of the 1930s, Wright and Curry
An examination of distinguished African-American 1930s artists and writers.
# 2044 | 1,913 words | 2 sources | MLA | 2001 | US


$19.95 Buy and instantly download this paper now

Description:

This paper takes a look at African American art. The paper analyzes Richard Wright's text "Joe Louis Uncovers Dynamite" and John Stewart Curry's painting "Mississippi".

From the Paper:

"As the Great Depression took its toll on numerous Americans on a daily basis, something also very critical was taking place within the society; the construction of new identities. A number of artists and writers saw this movement and felt their desire to portray the reality into their works including articles and paintings. Their perspectives on the African Americans - an ethnic group which has been constantly oppressed and discriminated against - in the 1930s was focused on the process of African Americans' works on establishing their own new identity; identity that is strong enough to protect their rights and pride against the prejudiced and discriminating society. For example, texts such as "Joe Louis Uncovers Dynamite" by Richard Wright and John Stewart Curry's painting "Mississippi" reflect the reality of circumstances and conflicts African Americans were faced with and the process of overcoming them throughout the 1930s."

Cite this Essay:

APA Format

African American Artists of the 1930s, Wright and Curry (2001, August 08) Retrieved January 20, 2021, from https://www.academon.com/essay/african-american-artists-of-the-1930s-wright-and-curry-2044/

MLA Format

"African American Artists of the 1930s, Wright and Curry" 08 August 2001. Web. 20 January. 2021. <https://www.academon.com/essay/african-american-artists-of-the-1930s-wright-and-curry-2044/>

Comments