U.S. Media on the 1979 Iranian Revolution and Hostage Crisis Comparison Essay by The Research Group

U.S. Media on the 1979 Iranian Revolution and Hostage Crisis
A comparison of the portrayals of the situation by the "Department of State Bulletin" and the "New York Times" emphasizing the failure of the "Times" to be an independent, impartial source.
# 20405 | 8,775 words | 12 sources | 1993 | US
Published on Mar 20, 2003 in Communication (Journalism) , History (Middle Eastern)


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From the Paper:

"Until the late 1970s, few Americans knew or cared much about Iran. Then, with the fall of the Shah's regime, the rise of the Khomeini revolution, and the 1979-1980 hostage crisis, Iran became a central preoccupation of the American public and of U.S. political life.


The chief source of news and opinion on Iran for most Americans throughout this period was the mainstream press. In principle the press was independent of both government policy and popular opinion, and broadly objective. In fact, however, the mainstream press shared the ignorance and the ideological blinders of the government it was supposed to be independent of, and of the public it was supposed to inform.


This study makes a qualitative comparative analysis of official positions on Iran through this period, as drawn from the..."

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U.S. Media on the 1979 Iranian Revolution and Hostage Crisis (2003, March 20) Retrieved August 18, 2022, from https://www.academon.com/comparison-essay/us-media-on-the-1979-iranian-revolution-and-hostage-crisis-20405/

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"U.S. Media on the 1979 Iranian Revolution and Hostage Crisis" 20 March 2003. Web. 18 August. 2022. <https://www.academon.com/comparison-essay/us-media-on-the-1979-iranian-revolution-and-hostage-crisis-20405/>

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