Two Works on the Asian and Pacific Theater of World War II Comparison Essay by scribbler

Two Works on the Asian and Pacific Theater of World War II
An examination and comparison of "Eagle Against the Sun" by Ronald Spector and "The Pacific Campaign" by Dan Van Der Vat.
# 152994 | 2,144 words | 8 sources | APA | 2013 | US
Published on May 01, 2013 in Literature (American) , History (U.S. World Wars) , Military (Military History)


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Description:

The paper provides some background to the Asian and Pacific scene of World War II and examines two history books; "Eagle Against the Sun" by Ronald Spector and "The Pacific Campaign" by Dan Van Der Vat. The paper compares these two works and relates that for a newer, but broader, perspective of the entire Pacific campaign based on new evidence, Spector would win out, but if one were familiar with the broader studies and wanted to get into more intimate detail on individual battles, battle strategies, and the minds of the commanders, then Van Der Vat would be the preferable book. The paper notes that there are no glaring errors apparent in either book, and the reason these books have stood the test of two decades within the historical paradigm is because their authorship is professional, yet entertaining; true history at its best.

Outline:
Background
Eagle Against the Sun
The Pacific Campaign
Causality or Results

From the Paper:

"The Asian and Pacific Theater of World War II was primarily a conflict between the Empire of Japan and the Allied Group (the United States, Great Britain and Commonwealth Allies, and France). France was primarily focused on the war in Europe, as was Great Britain, but the British, Australians, and Canadians were significantly involved in both the planning and fighting. Generally, the Pacific War is considered to have begun on December 7, 1941 with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and the invasion of British Malaya. However, there was a lengthy amount of preliminary saber rattling, invasion, and preliminary warning prior to this event. In fact, some authors consider the conflict to have started as far back as either July, 1937 or September, 1931; the dates of the Second Sino-Japanese War and the Japanese Invasion of Manchuria respectively (MacLeod, 2000; Murray and Millett, 2000).
"In general, Japan of the 1920s and 1930s became increasingly militaristic. This, combined with fervent nationalism and a hunt for resources, resulted in an invasion of China and the coveting or natural researouces in the East Indies and beyond. Because of the Allied situation in the Pacific, Japan had little choice but to prepare a wide-range invasion plan that would decimate the US Pacific Fleet, seize the Philippines, Guam and Wake Island; attack malaya and Hong Kong, and follow up with invasions in Java and Sumatra."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Jansen, M. (2000). The Making of Modern Japan. Boston: Harvard University Press.
  • MacLeod, R. (Ed.). (2000). Science and the Pacific War. Hingham, MA: Kluwer Academics.
  • Murray and Millett. (2000). A War to be Won. Boston: Harvard University Press.
  • Prange, G. (1982). At Dawn We Slept. New York: Penguin.
  • Spector, R. (1985). Eagle Against the Sun - The American War With Japan. New York: Macmaillan.

Cite this Comparison Essay:

APA Format

Two Works on the Asian and Pacific Theater of World War II (2013, May 01) Retrieved September 22, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/comparison-essay/two-works-on-the-asian-and-pacific-theater-of-world-war-ii-152994/

MLA Format

"Two Works on the Asian and Pacific Theater of World War II" 01 May 2013. Web. 22 September. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/comparison-essay/two-works-on-the-asian-and-pacific-theater-of-world-war-ii-152994/>

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