The Russian Mafia versus the Japanese Yakuza Comparison Essay by Quality Writers

The Russian Mafia versus the Japanese Yakuza
This is a comparative paper between the Russian Mafia and the Japanese Yakuza and includes the topics of how each is organized, the methods used, and their respective histories.
# 105204 | 2,070 words | 9 sources | APA | 2008 | US


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Description:

This paper discusses the many similarities and few differences between the Russian Mafia and the Japanese Yakuza. Specifically, the paper looks at how each is organized, the methods each employs, and the respective histories of each organization. In so doing, the paper ultimately argues that the chief differences between the two organizations are twofold: the Russian Mafia, for historical and cultural reasons, is even more powerful than its Japanese counterpart because of its close ties to the Russian state, and the Russian Mafia is even more brutal in its methods than the Yakuza - or most anyone else. In the final analysis, Robert I. Friedman and other close observers are not wrong to view the "Red Mafiya" with trepidation and dread.

Outline:
Introduction
How the Japanese Yakuza is Organized
How the Russian Mafia is Organized
The Methods Employed by the Japanese Yakuza
The Methods Employed by the Russian Mafia
History of the Japanese Yakuza
History of the Russian Mafia
Conclusion

From the Paper:

"The Russian Mafia has been around at least as long as its Yakuza counterpart. James O. Finckenauer writes that stealing the Czar's timber was not considered criminal during much of modern Russian history and professional criminals in the early years of the twentieth century conspired with Marxist political revolutionaries to overthrow first the Czar and then the short-lived revolutionary government that followed. While it is not clear, it appears as though the modern-day Russian Mafia was shaped by the exigencies of the Soviet-era Communist economy - an economy that often failed to provide adequately for its citizens. As a result, a 'shadow' economy sprang up, and it was one in which a criminal entrepreneurial class able to operate outside the law found the perfect climate in which to flourish."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Brossard, Andre. "Mafias, Triads, Yakuzas, and Cartels: A Comparative Study of Organized Crime." Crime & Justice International, 14, no.23 (1998): 5-32.
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation, "Golden Ada Company" (profile). U.S. Department of Justice: FBI-Investigative Programs, 2007. http://www.fbi.gov/hq/cid/orgcrime/casestudies/goldenada.htm (accessed September 7, 2007)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). "Vyacheslav Kirillovich Ivankov" (profile). U.S. Department of Justice: FBI-Investigative Programs, 2007. http://www.fbi.gov/hq/cid/orgcrime/casestudies/ivankov.htm (accessed September 7, 2007).
  • Finckenauer, James O. "The Russian Mafia." Society, 41, no.5 (2004): 61-65.
  • Friedman, Robert I. The Red Mafiya. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2000.

Cite this Comparison Essay:

APA Format

The Russian Mafia versus the Japanese Yakuza (2008, June 30) Retrieved March 31, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/comparison-essay/the-russian-mafia-versus-the-japanese-yakuza-105204/

MLA Format

"The Russian Mafia versus the Japanese Yakuza" 30 June 2008. Web. 31 March. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/comparison-essay/the-russian-mafia-versus-the-japanese-yakuza-105204/>

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