The Portrayal of Women in Literature Comparison Essay

The Portrayal of Women in Literature
Compares the portrayal of women as objects of desire in "A Doll's House" by Henrik Ibsen and "A Streetcar Named Desire" by Tennessee Williams.
# 129229 | 1,551 words | 2 sources | MLA | 2010 | GB


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Description:

This paper first explains that "A Doll's House" by Henrik Ibsen and "A Streetcar Named Desire" by Tennessee Williams are two plays that explore the ways in which a woman can be very desirable but cannot satisfy either herself or her world. The paper then goes on to explore how the protagonist Nora in Ibsen's play reacts to her relationship with her husband and finally rejects it. Whereas, Blanche Dubois in Williams' play, after considering desire as her only source of life, retreats into insanity. The paper stresses that society has formed the ways in which these women are viewed.

From the Paper:

"This quote shows that for him, the whole point, the whole image of being a man derives from a masculinity that is shown through the dominance of women. Nora is his dream come true, constantly playing the "damsel in distress" in need of his assistance. It also shows a certain falseness in his love for her, as he does not actually say "love" in this passage but instead "attractive", suggesting that he is only interested in the surface of Nora."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen - Methuen Drama, student edition 1985
  • A Streetcar Named Desire and Other Plays: "Sweet Bird of Youth"; "A Streetcar Named Desire"; "The Glass Menagerie" by Tennessee Williams - Penguin Classics 2000 edition

Cite this Comparison Essay:

APA Format

The Portrayal of Women in Literature (2010, September 22) Retrieved June 02, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/comparison-essay/the-portrayal-of-women-in-literature-129229/

MLA Format

"The Portrayal of Women in Literature" 22 September 2010. Web. 02 June. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/comparison-essay/the-portrayal-of-women-in-literature-129229/>

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