Historical Views of Leadership: Plato and Aristotle Comparison Essay by jpgaltmill

Historical Views of Leadership: Plato and Aristotle
A comparison of Plato's and Aristotle's beliefs on the importance and development of leaders.
# 153827 | 1,513 words | 6 sources | APA | 2014 | US
Published on Feb 19, 2014 in History (Greek and Roman) , Political Science (General) , Hot Topics (General)


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Description:

The paper explains that both Plato and Aristotle agreed that the "best men" should rule, that the purpose of leadership was the betterment of the State, and that education was paramount to forming these best men. The paper explains, however, that they disagreed on whether leaders were born with inherent qualities, or if these qualities depend solely on education. The paper also discusses how they disagreed about whether a strict separation between leaders and followers is required, and what form of government the best State should take. In conclusion, the paper points out that Plato failed to create the perfect state, while Aristotle was the teacher of Alexander the Great, a man who many consider as the best leader of the time.

From the Paper:

"What is leadership, and how do we attain the best and most effective leaders? These are questions that are as old as civilization itself. Bass (1974) wrote that, "from its infancy, the study of history has been the study of leaders" (as cited in Wren, 1995, p. 50). Since the study of history in the West is commonly held to begin with Herodotus of ancient Athens, it is not surprising that we should examine the historical views of leadership through the eyes of two titans of Greek thought: Plato and Aristotle.
"The two men lived in 4th century BCE Athens, so they shared much of the same background and experience. Aristotle was the younger of the two, and he was Plato's student. Where leadership is concerned, both philosophers agreed that the "best men" should rule, and that the purpose of leadership was the betterment of the State. They also agreed that education was paramount to forming these best men. They disagreed, however, on whether leaders were born with inherent qualities, or if these qualities depend solely on education. They also disagreed about whether or not a strict separation between leaders and followers is required, and what form of government the best State should take."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Aristotle. (1900). A treatise on government. In J. Thomas Wren (Ed.). Leader's companion: Insights on leadership through the ages (pp. 66). New York, NY: The Free Press.
  • Bass, B. (1974). Concepts of leadership: The beginnings. In J. Thomas Wren (Ed.). Leader's companion: Insights on leadership through the ages (pp. 49-51). New York, NY: The Free Press.
  • Edel, A. (1967). Aristotle. New York, NY: Dell Publishing.
  • Pindar (1969). The odes of Pindar. Trans. C.M. Bowra. London, England: Penguin Books.
  • Plato (1987). The Republic. Trans. Desmond Lee. London, England: Penguin Books.

Cite this Comparison Essay:

APA Format

Historical Views of Leadership: Plato and Aristotle (2014, February 19) Retrieved July 17, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/comparison-essay/historical-views-of-leadership-plato-and-aristotle-153827/

MLA Format

"Historical Views of Leadership: Plato and Aristotle" 19 February 2014. Web. 17 July. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/comparison-essay/historical-views-of-leadership-plato-and-aristotle-153827/>

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