Henry James' "The Tragic Muse" and Emile Zola's "Nana". Comparison Essay by The Research Group

Henry James' "The Tragic Muse" and Emile Zola's "Nana".
This study compares the direct and indirect characterizations of powerful actresses characterizations of Miriam in Henry James' "The Tragic Muse" and Nana in Emile Zola's "Nana".
# 21681 | 1,350 words | 2 sources | 1994 | US
Published on Mar 06, 2003 in Literature (English) , English (Comparison)


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From the Paper:

'This study will examine and compare the characterizations of Miriam in Henry James' "The Tragic Muse" and Nana in Emile Zola's "Nana". The study will first consider the ways James represents Miriam directly and indirectly, and will then compare and contrast James' portrayal of Miriam with Zola's portrayal of Nana directly and indirectly.

James from the first mention of Miriam shows her to be a remarkable, even mystical, woman. The author presents her in the words, thoughts and feelings of others as "the Tragic Muse," "that girl in Paris," "charming," and "the great modern personage". Nick Dormer has a vague memory of her, but he met her some time ago before she became "interesting," an actress, a model, and a character of increasing grace and power in her own and others' lives. Now, Nash tells Nick, "She's really ... "

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Henry James' "The Tragic Muse" and Emile Zola's "Nana". (2003, March 06) Retrieved April 21, 2024, from https://www.academon.com/comparison-essay/henry-james-the-tragic-muse-and-emile-zola-nana-21681/

MLA Format

" Henry James' "The Tragic Muse" and Emile Zola's "Nana"." 06 March 2003. Web. 21 April. 2024. <https://www.academon.com/comparison-essay/henry-james-the-tragic-muse-and-emile-zola-nana-21681/>

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