Control and Resistance in Latin American Novels Comparison Essay

Compares themes of control and resistance in the Latin American novels of Isabel Allende's "The House of the Spirits" and Laura Esquivel's "Like Water for Chocolate".
# 150477 | 1,200 words | 0 sources | 2012 | GB


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Description:

This paper explains that the themes of control and resistance within the family and the Latin American upheaval are central to both Isabel Allende's "The House of the Spirits" and Laura Esquivel's "Like Water for Chocolate" but used in different ways. Presenting examples from both novels, the author looks at issues such as parents and children, male versus female and political instability in Latin America, the author underscores that those who are in control and those who resist are not always completely black-and-white. The paper stresses that not only are these themes of control and resistance essential to understanding the novels but also are important to the historical and socio-political context of both books.

From the Paper:

"The roles of men and women are very much in contrast to this in "Like Water for Chocolate". Though there is not exactly very much physical violence between the two parties, the lack of strong male characters and surplus of strong female characters shows how the women in fact control men. This is shown through Mama Elena's control over the household even when Pedro, a male character moves in to the house. Traditionally, Pedro would have become head of the household.
"There is also a traditional parental control of the parents over their children. In "Like Water For Chocolate", this is best represented through the relationship between Mama Elena and Tita. Mama Elena exhibits this through the fact that she doesn't allow Tita to marry, as she is the youngest daughter and therefore has to take care of her mother until she dies. Tita very much recognises that "Unquestionably when it came to... dominating, Mama Elena was a pro". This control continues even after Mama Elena dies, as she comes back to haunt Tita. There are signs of this control being almost cyclic as Rosaura suggests that she will also not allow her daughter to marry so that "she can take care of me in my old age"."

Cite this Comparison Essay:

APA Format

Control and Resistance in Latin American Novels (2012, February 20) Retrieved February 07, 2023, from https://www.academon.com/comparison-essay/control-and-resistance-in-latin-american-novels-150477/

MLA Format

"Control and Resistance in Latin American Novels" 20 February 2012. Web. 07 February. 2023. <https://www.academon.com/comparison-essay/control-and-resistance-in-latin-american-novels-150477/>

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