Hurricane Katrina and Disaster Planning Case Study by Quality Writers

Hurricane Katrina and Disaster Planning
A case study analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the implementation of the National Response Plan (NRP) for Hurricane Katrina.
# 103078 | 2,114 words | 9 sources | APA | 2008 | US
Published on Apr 14, 2008 in Environmental Studies (Management) , Public Administration (General)


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Description:

This case study analysis discusses the implementation of the National Response Plan (NRP) under the National Incident Management System (NIMS) of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) of the United States government in response to the disaster of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The paper examines both the weaknesses and the strengths of the implementation of the NRP in New Orleans and Louisiana in August and September 2005. The paper concludes with recommendations for the future.

Table of Contents:
Project Summary
Size of the Project
Implementation Process
Environmental Setting
Leadership
Implementers
Beneficiaries
Communication
Evaluation of the Success of Implementation
Lessons Learned
Recommendations
General Conclusions

From the Paper:

"Given the political cost to President Bush in the wake of Katrina, the federal government seems to have decided that partnerships with local and state agencies are no longer effective. Instead of waiting for requests for assistance from state and local officials, the federal government has instituted policies that require proactive intervention by the federal government in the anticipation of any disaster. The implementation of disaster planning - pending further review of the role of FEMA - will be heavily militarized, with primary responsibility lying with Northcom; the U.S. Northern Command that was set up in the wake of 9-11 to deal with military crises on American soil. Thus, weeks after Hurricane Katrina, when Hurricane Wilma threatened Florida, President Bush overrode the wishes of his brother, the Governor of Florida, and made a three-star general the primary leader for implementation of the NRP in that case (Sylves 37). Thus, pending a radical revision of FEMA, the primary lesson learned from Katrina has been the necessity for proactive leadership over partnership, as exemplified by military command-and-control structures."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Burby, R. (2006). "Hurricane Katrina and the paradoxes of government disaster policy." The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences, 604.1: 171-191.
  • Harrald, J. (2006). "Agility and discipline: Critical success factors for disaster response." The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences, 604.1: 256-272.
  • Mitchell, J. (2006). "The primacy of partnership: Scoping a new national disaster recovery policy." The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences, 604.1: 228-255.
  • Nates, J. and Moyer, V. (2005). "Lessons from Katrina, tsunamis, and other disasters." Lancet, 366: 1144-1146.
  • Nigg, J., Barnshaw, J., and Torres, M. (2006). Hurricane Katrina and the flooding of New Orleans: Emergent issues in sheltering and temporary housing." The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences, 604.1: 113-128.

Cite this Case Study:

APA Format

Hurricane Katrina and Disaster Planning (2008, April 14) Retrieved April 21, 2021, from https://www.academon.com/case-study/hurricane-katrina-and-disaster-planning-103078/

MLA Format

"Hurricane Katrina and Disaster Planning" 14 April 2008. Web. 21 April. 2021. <https://www.academon.com/case-study/hurricane-katrina-and-disaster-planning-103078/>

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