Funding School Breakfasts Case Study by Nicky

Funding School Breakfasts
An analysis of the alternatives available to keep the school breakfast program open at Luther Burbank Unified School.
# 128949 | 1,429 words | 5 sources | APA | 2010 | US
Published on Aug 19, 2010 in Nutrition (Food) , Education (General) , Economics (General)


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Description:

The paper calculates the total revenues and expenditures associated with provision of the school breakfast program. The paper considers the costs of the first alternative that is to institute a program that provides school lunches for the entire school population. Then, the paper analyzes the second alternative that is to provide school breakfasts for only those who receive free and reduced school lunches. The paper shows how these two scenarios represent viable alternatives to cutting the school breakfast program at LBMS, but recommends the option of only providing free breakfasts to the free lunch population.

Outline:
Calculating Total Revenues and Expenditures
Alternative #1 - All Inclusive Program
Alternative #2 - Free Lunch Only Program
Recommendations

From the Paper:

"LBMS has 1,050 students who receive breakfast, snack and lunch. Of the 12,000 total students in the district, 42% are eligible for free or reduced school lunches. That means that 4,800 are eligible for free or reduced school lunches, The Federal Government provides cash subsidies to school that participate in the school breakfast program. It is not known how many students receive full price and how many receive reduced lunches. Therefore, the best-case scenario represents the hypothetical scenario where all of the students receive free breakfasts. The worst-case scenario assumes that all students receive reduced price lunches. In reality, the actual number of funds lost from the School Breakfast Program ranges from $5,280 - $6,720. These numbers may be higher, as LBMS qualifies as a severe need school and is reimbursed at an even higher rate."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Amonline.com (2008). Average School Lunch cost Jumps 10 Percent in One Year. 17 September 2008. Retrieved 18 November 2008 from http://www.amonline.com/online/article.jsp?id=22636
  • Cebrzynski, F. (2008). Execs warn against overreacting to economic stress in near term. Nation's Restaurant News. . FindArticles.com. Retrieved 21 Nov. 2008 from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3190/is_23_42/ai_n26675317
  • Hilleren, H. (2007). School Breakfast Program Cost/Benefit Analysis. UW-Extension, Family Living Program. Retrieved 22 November 2008 from http://dpi.wi.gov/fns/pdf/sbp_cost_benefit_analysis.pdf
  • LeConte (n.d.) California School Breakfast Facts. California Food Policy Advocates. Retrieved 22 November 2008 from http://www.cfpa.net/School_Food/Breakfast/Facts.htm
  • Luther Burbank Unified School District (LBUSD) (2008). Food Services. Retrieved 22 November 2008 from http://www.burbank.k12.ca.us/schools/middle/luther/food_services.html

Cite this Case Study:

APA Format

Funding School Breakfasts (2010, August 19) Retrieved April 19, 2021, from https://www.academon.com/case-study/funding-school-breakfasts-128949/

MLA Format

"Funding School Breakfasts" 19 August 2010. Web. 19 April. 2021. <https://www.academon.com/case-study/funding-school-breakfasts-128949/>

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