"The Rules of Attraction": Hopelessness Disguised as Humor Book Review by scribbler

"The Rules of Attraction": Hopelessness Disguised as Humor
A review of "The Rules of Attraction" by Bret Easton Ellis.
# 153003 | 1,199 words | 3 sources | MLA | 2013 | US


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Description:

The paper reviews "The Rules of Attraction" by Bret Easton Ellis and relates that this mid-80's set novel is laden with cynicism about the possibility of anyone ever finding true love. The paper points out the humorous moments in the novel, but relates that these are more satirical than comical and they tend to be saturated with bitter irony. The paper shows how ultimately, "The Rules of Attraction" is a disturbing, kaleidoscopic view of the debauchery that has come to pass itself off as love in our self-indulgent society.

From the Paper:

"The Rules of Attraction by Bret Easton Ellis is much more about breaking the rules than it is about following them. Telling the story of a hedonistic group of New England college students from a variety of points of view, this mid-80's set novel is laden with cynicism about the possibility of anyone ever finding true love. Each of the novel's three main characters, Sean, Lauren and Paul are like walking empty garbage cans, trying to fill themselves up with everything and anything they can get their hands on. However, the more trash they take in, the less fulfilled they become, until ultimately, they find their lives to be devoid of any meaning or purpose. As depressing as this sounds, the novel does have quite a few humorous moments in it; however, these are more satirical than comical and therefore they tend to be saturated with bitter irony. Ultimately, The Rules of Attraction is a disturbing, kaleidoscopic view of the debauchery that has come to pass itself off as love in our self-indulgent society.
"The depravity that defines the characters' lives is evident from the first few pages of the novel. The first chapter begins in mid-sentence, giving the reader the impression that they have come in on the middle of someone telling a story."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Ellis, Bret Easton. The Rules of Attraction. New York: Penguin, 1987.
  • Kakutani, Michiko "Books of The Times; Today's Students" New York Times, September 19, 1987
  • "The Rules of Adaptation" Nerve.com, October 11, 2002. http://www.nerve.com/content/the-rules-of-adaptation

Cite this Book Review:

APA Format

"The Rules of Attraction": Hopelessness Disguised as Humor (2013, May 01) Retrieved May 25, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/book-review/the-rules-of-attraction-hopelessness-disguised-as-humor-153003/

MLA Format

""The Rules of Attraction": Hopelessness Disguised as Humor" 01 May 2013. Web. 25 May. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/book-review/the-rules-of-attraction-hopelessness-disguised-as-humor-153003/>

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