The Human Condition in "Gulliver's Travels" Book Review by Spider

An analysis of Swift's portrayal of the human condition in his work, "Gulliver's Travels".
# 152177 | 1,342 words | 1 source | MLA | 2013 | KE
Published on Jan 10, 2013 in Literature (English) , Philosophy (Ancient Greek) , English (Analysis)


$19.95 Buy and instantly download this paper now

Description:

The paper highlights Swift's depiction of the human condition and looks at the fourth voyage at which point Gulliver hardly cares for humanity. The paper goes on to describe how Swift artistically unravels the limits of human understanding in his work and explains an individual's interaction with the society. The paper highlights Swift's use of symbolism to capture important features of the human condition and his engagement of the reader in identifying whether moral righteousness or physical power governs social life. This paper argues that Swift accurately exposes the human condition for what it really is.

From the Paper:

"To highlight Swift's depiction of the human condition we will look at the fourth voyage at which point Gulliver hardly cares for humanity. Gulliver has travelled far and wide and in most of the places he visited he was too small, too big or too down to earth. After the fourth voyage he finds himself in a place where his morality and rationality are lacking. He cannot choose between a humane and an unruly tribe and despite the fact that the humane tribe appeals to him, he finds their ways strange. It is important to note that the fourth voyage marks a change in the novel's satirical thrust. Unlike in the first three, Gulliver finds himself among horses and is willing to prolong his stay (Swift 189).
"Swift artistically unravels the limits of human understanding in his work. He highlights the fact that humanity is not aware of all things. In addition, Gulliver's Travels emphasizes the natural limit of human understanding. Swift criticizes those who pride themselves as being knowledgeable by depicting Laputans as self-centered and completely disagreeable because they blatantly condemn anyone who doesn't habitually self-theorize. Practical knowledge is not spared since in all its applications in the story, it hardly produces results. The author strongly supports the idea that certain realms of knowledge shouldn't be ventured into. This is why he depicts rational societies as those capable of living their lives steadily without an abnormal dependence on abstract ideas."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Swift, Jonathan. Gulliver's Travels. Plain label Books, 2011. Print.

Cite this Book Review:

APA Format

The Human Condition in "Gulliver's Travels" (2013, January 10) Retrieved October 16, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/book-review/the-human-condition-in-gulliver-travels-152177/

MLA Format

"The Human Condition in "Gulliver's Travels"" 10 January 2013. Web. 16 October. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/book-review/the-human-condition-in-gulliver-travels-152177/>

Comments