'The Confessions of Nat Turner' Book Review by writingsensation

'The Confessions of Nat Turner'
This paper discusses the book "The Confessions of Nat Turner" by William Styron.
# 75777 | 1,200 words | 1 source | MLA | 2006 | US


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Description:

In this paper, the writer looks at the book "The Confessions of Nat Turner" which is described as a novel of historical fiction. The writer notes that Styron writes the novel in first person and the story is ostensibly told by Nat Turner himself, forcing the reader to look at the complex issues that led to the rebellion. The writer maintains that the reader is forced to see Nat Turner as a complex and conflicted human being. Further, the writer discusses the ideas of slavery and freedom within the novel. The writer concludes that as a whole, the book gives the reader an in-depth view of what it might have been like to be an angry slave during the time depicted.

From the Paper:

"Although the book is divided into four parts, the parts do not follow a sequential structure. The images we get of Nat Turner and his thoughts are fragmented and shift between time periods. This adds to the credibility of Styron's fiction. A person under the kinds of stress Nat Turner was in prison would not calmly recall his life in an orderly and sequential way. Instead, images, events or comments would trigger a wave of memories. Only gradually can the reader piece together the sequential events of Nat Turner's life.
Inevitably, the book deals with the idea of freedom. Nat Turner is quite taken with the young white woman Miss Margaret, whom he occasionally drives from place to place. Miss Margaret claims to be an abolitionist, reads poetry to Nat and listens to him recite psalms."

Cite this Book Review:

APA Format

'The Confessions of Nat Turner' (2006, December 20) Retrieved February 23, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/book-review/the-confessions-of-nat-turner-75777/

MLA Format

"'The Confessions of Nat Turner'" 20 December 2006. Web. 23 February. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/book-review/the-confessions-of-nat-turner-75777/>

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