"Split: Class and Cultural Divides in American Politics" Book Review by Nicky

A review of the book "Split: Class and Cultural Divides in American Politics" by Mark Brewer and Jeffrey Stonecash.
# 146004 | 1,048 words | 1 source | MLA | 2010 | US


$19.95 Buy and instantly download this paper now

Description:

The paper explains the ideas of Mark Brewer and Jeffrey Stonecash on culture and class in their analysis of American political choices in their book "Split: Class and Cultural Divides in American Politics". The paper discusses how the authors primarily point to class as the driving force in the evolution of the so-called culture wars and explains that divisions of opportunity caused by social class are more significant than ever before in politics. The paper looks at the authors' treatment of the 2004 election and how they show that class identification seemed to play a clear role in voter choice, more so than specific cultural concerns. The paper then discusses the presidential election of Barack Obama and how it supports the thesis of this work, since most people voted on 'class' issues.

From the Paper:

"The outcomes of elections and partisan affiliations are both affected by class and culture, suggests Split. Class produces culture and vice versa. However, while Brewer and Stonecash consider both culture and class in their analysis of American political choices, particularly of the 2004 election, it is class that they primarily finger as the driving force in the evolution of the so-called culture wars. They suggest that American politics has become more politically partisan. Income and cultural opinions both drive voter choice more than they did thirty years ago (Brewer & Stonecash 183). Polarization has grown on the elite and mass level, and perceiving one party's candidate as positive is more likely to result in the perception that the other candidate is 'negative' in character (Brewer & Stonecash 184). Class polarization has resulted in political polarization to such a degree that even within social classes there is greater fractiousness and dislike of the other side's candidate--liberal upper-class individuals are more hostile to conservative members of the upper-class, for example."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Brewer, Mark & Jeffrey Stonecash. Split: Class and Cultural Divides in American Politics. CQ Press, 2006.

Cite this Book Review:

APA Format

"Split: Class and Cultural Divides in American Politics" (2010, December 12) Retrieved July 11, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/book-review/split-class-and-cultural-divides-in-american-politics-146004/

MLA Format

""Split: Class and Cultural Divides in American Politics"" 12 December 2010. Web. 11 July. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/book-review/split-class-and-cultural-divides-in-american-politics-146004/>

Comments