Pentateuch: Creation in "Genesis" Book Review by scribbler

Pentateuch: Creation in "Genesis"
Looks at Genesis 1, 2 and 3, which show the switch from God being alone to man now being a reactor to God.
# 153378 | 1,245 words | 5 sources | MLA | 2013 | US
Published on May 26, 2013 in Religion and Theology (The Bible)


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Description:

This paper explains that Genesis 1 is about the creation of the world, the beginning of everything, and the importance of God, who created the world out of nothing. Next, the author interprets Genesis 2, as demonstrating the importance of man with the creation of Adam and Eve, thus showing the love that God has for man by creating him in His image. The paper concludes that Genesis 3, which is about the responsibility to be obedient to God because He is their creator, reveals that the once perfect relationship in Genesis 2 is no longer perfect.

Table of Contents:
Establishing the Text.
Differences.
Locating the Text.
Examining the Text.
Reflecting on the Text: What Message does this Passage have for you Personally?

From the Paper:

"Genesis 2 is read more as a narrative - a story - than anything else that tells the story of creation as a historical piece of information replete with the beginning of mankind - Adam and Eve. There are laws found in Genesis 2. It is in Genesis 2 that we first discover that Adam and Eve must not eat the fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil. This is a law that God gives them - though they do not follow. God has commands that he gives, such as the seventh day being a day of rest as well.
"The purpose of Genesis 2 seems to be to show the evolution of man and his fall from good to evil as well as the importance of the creation of man and woman and their marriage. Genesis 2, beginning with 2:4, seems like a very personal account of creation because man is introduced. That is to say that the while God was creating the earth in Genesis 1 up until 2:3, it is such a big picture of his creation. From 2:4 on, we are brought into a different type of creation. There is a bond that is created from Genesis 1 to 2 as Adam gets his name from the earth in 2:7 and then Eve is created in order to correspond with Adam (436) - making a true union of souls."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Eiselen, Frederick Carl. The Abingdon Bible Commentary. Doubleday, 1979. Print.
  • Freedman, David Noel., Myers, Allen C., & Beck, Astrid B. Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2000. Print.
  • Plaut, W. Gunther., & Stein, David E.S. The Torah: A Modern Commentary, Revised Edition. Union for Reform Judaism; Revised Edition, 2005. Print.
  • Tyndale. New Living Translations Bible: Holy Bible. Tyndale House Publishers, Inc; 2nd edition, 2004.
  • Young, Robert. Young's Literal Translation of the Bible. Greater Truth Publishers; 3rd edition, 2005.

Cite this Book Review:

APA Format

Pentateuch: Creation in "Genesis" (2013, May 26) Retrieved September 19, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/book-review/pentateuch-creation-in-genesis-153378/

MLA Format

"Pentateuch: Creation in "Genesis"" 26 May 2013. Web. 19 September. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/book-review/pentateuch-creation-in-genesis-153378/>

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