"Global Issues, Local Arguments" on Cultural Growing Pains Book Review by scribbler

"Global Issues, Local Arguments" on Cultural Growing Pains
A review of the essays in June Johnson's book "Global Issues, Local Arguments" on the digital divide and global hunger.
# 153023 | 1,412 words | 0 sources | 2013 | US
Published on May 01, 2013 in Sociology (General) , Literature (General)


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Description:

The paper looks at the essays in June Johnson's book "Global Issues, Local Arguments" on the most relevant sites of conflict in the current global domain, namely, the issue of global hunger and the cultural tensions surrounding media technology. This paper argues that these tensions represent "growing pains" in the emergence of a more cohesive culture of humanity, and rather than viewing these sites of conflict as permanent barriers between the "haves" and "have nots" in the world, we can conceptualize them as opportunities for growth and understanding.

Outline:
Feeding Global Populations
Cultural Rights

From the Paper:

"Food and water are perhaps the most basic, most common, and most urgent human needs. Yet, there has never been a society in which this need is universally met - there are always people living "hand to mouth" in every era, and the modern era of globalization is no different. In contemporary society the problem of hunger seems infinitely more tragic because the resources of the first world are sufficient to provide each citizen with nutrition to meet their daily requirement for food (energy) and water. However, political and economic dynamics prevent the efficient distribution of high-quality food to the people who need it. In Vanadana Shiva's piece about the gift of food the author presents a very different, ethically-based perspective on food distribution, and one that does not limit itself to concern for human welfare. This spiritual perspective - that we should follow cultural traditions that make sharing food with others routine and even beautiful - does not follow the view of food as a "resource" to be quantified and distributed in a zero-sum economic game. Instead, Shiva discusses the deeper meaning of food as nourishment and safety for the entire community - one that extends from humans to birds and ants. In her essay she makes a quiet, cogent case for our responsibility to those who are smaller and less powerful than we are."

Cite this Book Review:

APA Format

"Global Issues, Local Arguments" on Cultural Growing Pains (2013, May 01) Retrieved November 29, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/book-review/global-issues-local-arguments-on-cultural-growing-pains-153023/

MLA Format

""Global Issues, Local Arguments" on Cultural Growing Pains" 01 May 2013. Web. 29 November. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/book-review/global-issues-local-arguments-on-cultural-growing-pains-153023/>

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