Galloway and Thacker on the Dangers of Networks Book Review by scribbler

A review of "The Exploit: A Theory of Networks" by Alexander Galloway and Eugene Thacker.
# 152218 | 849 words | 1 source | APA | 2013 | US
Published on Jan 14, 2013 in Literature (American) , Computer and Technology (Networks)


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Description:

The paper reviews "The Exploit: A Theory of Networks" where Galloway and Thacker speak against the rise of new, great networking powers that are establishing a kind of sovereignty like a nation-state. The paper discusses the authors' use of the virus metaphor to describe the construction of modern networks, and highlights how Galloway and Thacker call for a new form of sovereignty and argue that individuals must consciously associate with something larger than themselves, rather than allow themselves to be absorbed in networks. The paper then points out and discusses the problems with Galloway and Thacker's criticism of networks.

From the Paper:

"The term 'networking' is familiar to anyone who has ever looked for a job--networking refers to establishing links and connections between one's self and others. Networking enables the individual to become something larger than him or herself--part of a connected web of identities. On a global scale, networking is often portrayed as something inherently democratic, something that can be informally begun by an individual, simply by sending an email to a like-minded person. Networks have been said to have replaced traditional hierarchies of identity and power, and as they grow more entrenched, will undercut the authority of institutionalized hierarchies and nation-states.
"However, according to The Exploit: A Theory of Networks (Electronic Mediations) by professors Alexander Galloway and Eugene Thacker, such a fundamentally short-sighted view neglects to consider the controlling aspects of modern networks and networking. Galloway and Thacker speak of the rise of new, great networking powers that are establishing a kind of sovereignty like a nation-state. While the idea of a network can seem positive when one is part of a social network like Facebook, networking can also refer to a terrorist network, an organization that is more difficult to curtail because it transgresses borders of nationhood, even of conventional religious and ethnic boundaries. (Such as Sunni and Shiites who might form self-interested alliances to attack the United States as part of a terrorist organization)."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Galloway, Alexander & Eugene Thacker. (2007).The Exploit: A Theory of Networks (Electronic Mediations). University of Minnesota Press.

Cite this Book Review:

APA Format

Galloway and Thacker on the Dangers of Networks (2013, January 14) Retrieved November 12, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/book-review/galloway-and-thacker-on-the-dangers-of-networks-152218/

MLA Format

"Galloway and Thacker on the Dangers of Networks" 14 January 2013. Web. 12 November. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/book-review/galloway-and-thacker-on-the-dangers-of-networks-152218/>

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