"A Tale of Two Cities" Book Review by gutless

"A Tale of Two Cities"
A discussion of the theme in Charles Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities" that, although not the only answer or key, love is an important, defining portion of achieving freedom.
# 103816 | 1,634 words | 5 sources | MLA | 2008 | US
Published on May 28, 2008 in Literature (English) , English (Analysis)


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Description:

This paper discusses Charles Dickens' famous novel, "A Tale of Two Cities" and looks at how Dickens illustrates in the novel that, without the redeeming power of love, there is no chance of escaping or freeing oneself from any prison, whether it is literal or metaphorical, brought upon oneself or brought upon one by the doings of another.

From the Paper:

"The first category of imprisonment in A Tale of Two Cities is that of literal confinements. For example, Dr. Manette was literally imprisoned in the Bastille by two Marquis during the unjust Ancien Regime in France. Because of the customs and thoughts of the time, the Bastille was a horrid prison that, due to the fact that the prisoners were not properly treated, could strike fear into the hearts of all citizens. These characteristics are owing to the common thought of society, "if you were a criminal in prison, you deserved what happened to you in there" (Stordahl). Manette's literal liberator is assumed to be Monsieur Defarge as he said, "I went through a lot of trouble to get him," however, Manette is not mentally freed from the Bastille. The Doctor's confinement in the Bastille takes both physical and mental tolls upon him, his hair turned a brilliant white and his mind became greatly deterred from the ability to function normally under stress. "

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Albert. "Nation and Generation." Charles Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities. (1980): 55-72. Rpt. In Modern Critical Interpretations. Ed. Harold Bloom. Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers, 1987. 44
  • Dickens, Charles. A Tale of Two Cities. New York: Bantam, 2003.
  • Kucich, John. "Revolution- Their Own Prison." Charles Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities. (1980): 55-72. Rpt. In Modern Critical Interpretations. Ed. Harold Bloom. Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers, 1987. 67.
  • Marcus, David D. "The Carlylean Vision. A Tale of Two Cities" Studies in the Novel 8. 1976. Rpt. In Charles Dickens's A Tale of Two Cities. Ed. Herald Bloom. New York; Chelsea House, 1987. 23-35.
  • Stordahl, John. Class Notes. Trabuco Hills High School. Date Unknown.

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APA Format

"A Tale of Two Cities" (2008, May 28) Retrieved August 09, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/book-review/a-tale-of-two-cities-103816/

MLA Format

""A Tale of Two Cities"" 28 May 2008. Web. 09 August. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/book-review/a-tale-of-two-cities-103816/>

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