LEARN ABOUT NOMINALIZATIONS, CAPITONYMS AND THE ETHICS OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN

LEARN ABOUT NOMINALIZATIONS, CAPITONYMS AND THE ETHICS OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN

► Download and Listen: PYD 47: “Learn about Nominalizations, Capitonyms, and the Ethics of Abraham Lincoln”


Abraham Lincoln: Ethics and Morality

This week’s Paper of the Week on AcaDemon is paper #150950, “The Politics, Ethics, and Morality of Abraham Lincoln” is the first topic of discussion in Power Your Document Podcast Episode 47 and in this discussion, host Dave Jackson, examines and summarizes this truly fascinating document about President Abraham Lincoln. The paper provides in-depth analysis of the life and times of Abraham Lincoln and in so doing, presents a fascinating portrait of one of America’s greatest leaders.

Avoiding Nominalizations

In Segment 2 of PYD Episode 47, Dave wades into the murky waters of nominalizations. He explains what they are, why we need to avoid them in our writing, and most importantly, how to avoid them. If you want to improve your writing, don’t miss this very important discussion on avoiding nominalizations.

Capitonyms

Okay, so we’ve covered acronyms, antonyms, and homonyms, but what about capitonyms? Do you even know what they are? Dave does and he explains them in Segment 3 of PYD Episode 47. So have a listen if you can remember or just don’t know. Dave will tell you! And just as he promised, here is a list of a few capitonyms just to spark your memory:

August (the month and something majestic)

Bill (the name and the amount to be paid)

Cancer (the constellation and the disease)

Earth (the planet and the land)

Job (the Biblical character and employment)

Lent (past tense of the word ‘lend’ and a period on the Christian calendar)

March (the month and a type of walk)

May (the month and the verb)

Nice (the French city and the adjective that means pleasant)

Polish (someone from Poland and the act of rubbing something to make it shiny)


And that’s it for this week’s update on the latest PYD episode. Please take a minute and listen. There's always something new going on and learn; you won’t be disappointed. And, if you have the time, please comment on this blog, talk to us on FB, or email us at podcast@academon.com and to tell us your thoughts about what you'd like covered in upcoming episodes.

Published on Nov 05, 2013