Tedium and Creativity: Valorization of Manioc Cult Article Review by Suzannah

Tedium and Creativity: Valorization of Manioc Cult
This essay reviews and analyses S. L. Heckler's article, "Tedium and Creativity: The Valorization of Manioc Cultivation and Piaroa Women."
# 113944 | 1,100 words | 9 sources | APA | 2008 | FR


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Description:

The status and position of women living within Amazonian communities has been widely researched over the past forty years, with the majority of earlier studies reporting that woman were controlled through a division of labor that served as a socialization process. This essay reviewsS. L. Heckler's article, "Tedium and Creativity: The Valorization of Manioc Cultivation and Piaroa Women", in which Heckler contends that current research suggests, "that division of labor enforces and underscores the complementarities of gender roles and that this complementarity is the basis of Amazonian social life".

Outline:
Introduction
Gender Issues and Socialization
Conclusion
References

From the Paper:

"Heckler reported that all four women considered manioc, which they all cultivated to a greater or lesser extent, as being a vital element of their lives, while individual success, or lack of it, significantly contributed to both personal and corporal status. Laura, for example, was highly respected in the community because of her profound agricultural skill and knowledge, and because she was the daughter-in-law of the group's most powerful shaman. Maria, who like Laura was a middle-aged woman, was also highly respected because of agricultural skills. The third woman, Marie Gloria, who was ten years younger than Laura and Maria, although not particularly recognized for her agricultural knowledge, was valued for her processing skills. The final subject used was a younger woman, Antonia, (around thirty years old), who spent a limited amount of time growing manioc due to having to provide a wage. This, as Heckler states, causes women, such as Antonia, "obvious discomfort at having to admit ... that they did not work in the garden every day" (2004). This indicates that women who do not, or are seen as not, fulfilling their 'feminine obligations' are considered as being inferior. This, as seen in the case of Antonia produces feelings of inadequacy, personal failure, shame, and guilt, for the 'failure' to comply with local tradition."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Descola, P. (1994). "In the society of nature: a native ecology in Amazonia."Cambridge: University Press.
  • Gow, P. (1991). "Of mixed blood: kinship and history in Peruvian Amazonia." Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • Heckler, S. L. (2004). "Tedium and Creativity: The Valorization of Manioc Cultivation and Piaroa Women." Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol 10; 2004.
  • McCallum, C. (2001). "Gender and sociality in Amazonia: how real people are made." Oxford: Berg.
  • Meillassoux, C. (1981). "Maidens, meal and money; capitalism and the domestic community." Cambridge: University Press.

Cite this Article Review:

APA Format

Tedium and Creativity: Valorization of Manioc Cult (2009, May 21) Retrieved May 21, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/article-review/tedium-and-creativity-valorization-of-manioc-cult-113944/

MLA Format

"Tedium and Creativity: Valorization of Manioc Cult" 21 May 2009. Web. 21 May. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/article-review/tedium-and-creativity-valorization-of-manioc-cult-113944/>

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