Shhh! Don't Ask, Don't Tell Argumentative Essay

An argumentative essay on why gay men and lesbians should be allowed to serve in the United States military.
# 152064 | 1,173 words | 8 sources | APA | 2010 | US
Published on Nov 26, 2012 in Law (General) , Hot Topics (General) , Military (General)


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Description:

This paper explains a statute known as "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" (DADT) that prohibits homosexual men and women from openly serving in the United States (US) Armed Forces. It goes on to provide several facts as to why gay men and lesbians should be able to serve their country without being forced to hide their true identity. It also provides statistics and research findings to back up this argument.

From the Paper:

''No rational person can doubt the ability of a homosexual man or woman to be as patriotic, intelligent, and hard-working as one of their heterosexual counterparts. However, there are intolerant individuals who maintain a belief that gay men and lesbians cannot be as effective in combat as a heterosexual service member. They assert that homosexuals will be stereotypically feminine, overly emotional, and not capable of fighting in battle. First, women honorably serve and protect the rights of American's on a daily basis in the military, rendering the feminine argument meaningless. Secondly, dating back to World War I, homosexuals have fought defended the United States capably and effectively in combat. Finally, less than a month ago, CNN reported a story about a soldier who was recently discharged from the Army under DADT. Darren Manzella was not a cook in the Army, nor was he an office worker. He was a combat medic who served two tours in Iraq with distinction (1). He is one of many homosexuals that have proven to be effective in combat situations.''

Sample of Sources Used:

  • "About "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"" Servicemembers Legal Defense Network. Servicemembers legal Defense Network. Web. 15 Nov. 2009. <http://www.sldn.org/pages/about-dadt>.
  • Belkin, Aaron. "Abandoning "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Will Decrease Anit-Gay Violence." Palm Center. University of California, Santa Barbara, 1 May 2005. Web. 16 Nov. 2009. <http://www.palmcenter.org/press/dadt/in_print/abandoning_dont_ask_dont_tell_will_decrease_anti_gay_violence>.
  • Carney, Ralph M., Jared B. Jobe, and Gregory M. Herek. Out in Force: Sexual Orientation and the Military (Worlds of Desire: The Chicago Series on Sexuality, Gender, and Culture). New York: University Of Chicago, 1996. Print.
  • Dropp, Kyle, and Jon Cohen. "Acceptance of Gay People in Military Grows Dramatically." Washington Post. Washington Post, 19 July 2008. Web. 15 Nov. 2009. <http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/07/18/AR2008071802561.html>.
  • Gates, Gary J. "Don't Ask, Don't Tell." Http://www.law.ucla.edu. University of California, Los Angeles, 18 July 2008. Web. 15 Nov. 2009. <http://www.law.ucla.edu/williamsinstitute/publications/GatesDADTTestimony2008.pdf>.

Cite this Argumentative Essay:

APA Format

Shhh! Don't Ask, Don't Tell (2012, November 26) Retrieved November 15, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/argumentative-essay/shhh-don-t-ask-don-t-tell-152064/

MLA Format

"Shhh! Don't Ask, Don't Tell" 26 November 2012. Web. 15 November. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/argumentative-essay/shhh-don-t-ask-don-t-tell-152064/>

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