Working Women Analytical Essay by Peerless

Working Women
A study of the sociological effects of the working woman on society.
# 5461 | 1,500 words | 6 sources | MLA | 2001 | US


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Description:

This paper deals with the concept of working mothers and the issues which surround it. The increasing number of mothers, especially those of young children, who are moving into the labor market is a feature of contemporary society which continues to exert a major influence on the structure of relationships and families. This paper addresses these changes and discusses what effects this issue will have in the future. It also examines the way in which society has been affected by the issue of working mothers, and discusses the controversy and debate surrounding the possible effects on child development. The paper focuses on the importance of childcare and the problems which presently face society over this issue, as well as the continued debate over sexual inequality, both within the family and society in general.

From the Paper:

"Thankfully, the "cereal packet" image of the family is on its way out yet, according to sociologists, the sexual inequality associated with assigning men the role of economic provider and women as the child rearer and homemaker, is still very mush in existence. These social stereotypes remain in spite of the fact that, within the last few decades, there has been a sharp increase in the number of mothers deciding to venture outside the home and into paid employment. Statistics show that the level of mothers in paid employment has risen from one in eight in the 1950's to a present day estimate of over fifty percent (Hoffman 285) and, according to Reich (1994), by 1994 women were found to compose forty-five percent of the entire labor force."

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Working Women (2003, February 11) Retrieved October 24, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/working-women-5461/

MLA Format

"Working Women" 11 February 2003. Web. 24 October. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/working-women-5461/>

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