Whitman and the Civil War Analytical Essay by RightRiters

Whitman and the Civil War
A look at how American poet and writer Walt Whitman expressed himself during the American Civil War.
# 23796 | 897 words | 3 sources | MLA | 2002 | US


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Description:

Walt Whitman, through his seemingly simple poems and notes, managed to encapsulate an era of American history that textbooks cannot. The paper shows that the human experience reflected in Whitman's work in light of the major upheavals reveal a truly special voice of the Civil War. This paper examines the writings and poetry of Walt Whitman which reflect his views on the Civil War. The paper shows how poems such as "Two Brooklyn Boys", "A New York Soldier", "Bad Wounds, the Young", and "A Secesh Brave" emphasize the focus on the common men of the war rather than the generals and battles of the larger picture. It concludes that it is Whitman's view and his vision of that time that many claim gave the war a soul and a face.

From the Paper:

"Shortly after that, President Lincoln was assassinated. In response Whitman wrote a speech called "Death of Abraham Lincoln" which he reportedly gave on the date of the assassination for years to come. "The whole involved, baffling, multiform whirl of the Secession period," said Whitman. It proved the universal and even religious significance of the war; it was democracy's originary moment, it's rite of crucifixion. Whitman ceased thinking of the country as having been born during the Revolution and began to see the Civil war and assassination as America's true "partition and delivery" and that the nation had been "born again, consistent in itself" (Memoranda 10)."

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Whitman and the Civil War (2003, April 16) Retrieved November 25, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/whitman-and-the-civil-war-23796/

MLA Format

"Whitman and the Civil War" 16 April 2003. Web. 25 November. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/whitman-and-the-civil-war-23796/>

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