Were the Nubians a Threat to Middle Kingdom Egypt? Analytical Essay

An analysis of the threat posed by Nubia towards the middle kingdom. Analysis considers upper and lower Nubia as well as the nomads from both eastern and western deserts.
# 146456 | 3,103 words | 21 sources | MLA | 2010 | NZ


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Description:

In this article, the writer first discusses the geographic and economic foundations of Nubia and the riverine territory above the first Nile cataract. Following this, the writer introduces three sources of archaeological evidence - indigenous Nubian graves, the cataract forts and Pharonic inscriptions in Nubia. After outlining the data the writer analyzes it, concentrating mainly on the purpose of the cataract forts. This shows that any Nubian threat to Egypt related to the security of trade along the Nile. The writer shows that the people of Lower Nubia were unable to pose a military threat to Egypt, and the nomads of the eastern desert, while capable of harassing trade caravans, were not seen as a significant threat either. The writer maintains that those of Upper Nubia on the other hand, while remaining a significant trading partner of Egypt, were thought to harbour expansionist pretensions and it was this that worried the Egyptian state.

From the Paper:

"The lack of pottery indicates significant change in trade patterns with Egypt. During the period I/b, contemporaneous with the first intermediate period and the very early, formative stages of the Middle Kingdom, Egyptian pottery was common. This indicates that trade occurred between the Egyptians and the C-group people and that, judging by the quantities found, it was probably efficient. After the Middle Kingdom period in stage II/b, the amount of pottery returns to the same levels as I/b, leaving a hiatus in II/a. The most likely implication of this is that the indigenous people either rejected Egyptian material in a protest against the occupation, or that the Egyptians, now in control of the region, had neither the need nor the desire to trade with them.
"The idea that the inhabitants of Lower Nubia were isolated from the Egyptian occupiers is further confirmed by an analysis of the execration texts. If trade and contact existed between these two groups of people then a degree of acculturation might reasonably be expected."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Adams, William Y. 'Nubia Corridor to Africa'. London: Allen Lane, 1977.
  • Adams, William Y. 'The first colonial empire: Egypt in Nubia 3200 - 1200 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 3200 - 1200 end_of_the_skype_highlighting begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 3200 - 1200 end_of_the_skype_highlighting begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 3200 - 1200 end_of_the_skype_highlighting BC'. Comparative studies in Society and History (CUP). v26.1,(1984) pp36-71.
  • Bonnet, C. 'Upper Nubia from 3000 to 1000 BC'. In W. V. Davies (ed.), Egypt and Africa, Nubia from prehistory to Islam. London: British Museum Press, 1991.
  • Bourriau, J. 'Relationships between Egypt and Kerma during the Middle and New Kingdoms'. In W. V. Davies (ed.), Egypt and Africa, Nubia from prehistory to Islam. London: British Museum Press, 1991.
  • Edwards, David N. 'The Nubian past an Archaeology of the Sudan'. London: Routledge, 2004. pp75-112.

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Were the Nubians a Threat to Middle Kingdom Egypt? (2010, December 28) Retrieved August 21, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/were-the-nubians-a-threat-to-middle-kingdom-egypt-146456/

MLA Format

"Were the Nubians a Threat to Middle Kingdom Egypt?" 28 December 2010. Web. 21 August. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/were-the-nubians-a-threat-to-middle-kingdom-egypt-146456/>

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