The Mythological Supports of Beckett's "Waiting for Godot" Analytical Essay by msjohn4

The Mythological Supports of Beckett's "Waiting for Godot"
A look at the mythological allusions in Samuel Beckett's "Waiting for Godot."
# 151899 | 1,057 words | 3 sources | MLA | 2009 | US
Published on Oct 22, 2012 in Literature (English) , Literature (French)


$19.95 Buy and instantly download this paper now

Description:

This paper examines the mythological references and allusions in Samuel Beckett's play "Waiting for Godot", particularly noting those connected to life and death. The paper cites various examples of this from the play, especially the struggle between life and death as seen in various symbols. These include the mandrake and weeping willow, both which are connected to fertility. It also addresses the symbol of Fortune, which is also related to ancient fertility myths and safe births. Additionally, the paper explores the conflicts of the various characters in Beckett's work, and how these were resolved. The paper concludes by asserting that Beckett had a Structuralist view of humanity. MLA-style references are included in the footnotes.

From the Paper:

"A final mythological reference in the play relates to this unseen mediation and is made by Pozzo in the second act. When asked by Vladimir when he became blind, Pozzo replies" I woke up one fine day as blind as Fortune." The goddess Fortuna also has her beginning in fertility myths; expecting mothers would pray to her for successful births. It was not until she was combined with the Greek Goddess of Chance, Tyche, that she took on her role as blind wheel-turner. That Pozzo associates himself with a blind Fortune becomes interesting when taken into account with other elements of his character. While the first act featured, Pozzo controlling heavily burdened Lucky with a whip, shouts, and a long rope, the second act has a blind Pozzo being led by a short rope that is attached to a mute and laden down Lucky. However, despite the apparent differences, Pozzo and Lucky's relationship is relatively unchanged from Act I to Act II, and I would say their function in the play remains exactly the same."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Mercatante, Anthony S. and James R. Dow. "Fortuna," in The Facts on File Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend, third edition. New York: Facts on File, Inc., 2009.
  • Mercatante, Anthony S. and James R. Dow. "Willow," in The Facts on File Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend, third edition. New York: Facts on File, Inc., 2009.
  • Mercatante, Anthony S. and James R. Dow. "Mandrake," in The Facts on File Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend, third edition. New York: Facts on File, Inc., 2009.

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

The Mythological Supports of Beckett's "Waiting for Godot" (2012, October 22) Retrieved May 31, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/the-mythological-supports-of-beckett-waiting-for-godot-151899/

MLA Format

"The Mythological Supports of Beckett's "Waiting for Godot"" 22 October 2012. Web. 31 May. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/the-mythological-supports-of-beckett-waiting-for-godot-151899/>

Comments