The Great Global Convergence of the 1500s Analytical Essay by scribbler

The Great Global Convergence of the 1500s
An analysis of the great global convergence of the 1500s as the beginning of modern world history and globalization.
# 153371 | 1,459 words | 5 sources | MLA | 2013 | US
Published on May 26, 2013 in History (Asian) , History (European)


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Description:

The paper explains how trade was the most important cause of the global convergence in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, the era that characterizes the linkages of peoples, resources, and human knowledge. The paper explores how this era led to the process of globalization and the worldwide integration of peoples, political structures, economics, finance, social and cultural institutions, and the flow of resources and ideas. The paper also discusses how today's unequal distribution of political and economic powers, with Europeans dominating the world affairs, has its roots in the global convergence which began in 1500s. The paper asserts that great global convergence of the 1500s may rightly be described as the beginning of modern world history.

From the Paper:

"The fifteenth and sixteenth centuries were the moment of historic changes. For the first time in human history, peoples of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas began to intermingle and exchange resources and ideas with each other on a massive scale. The era characterizes the linkages of peoples, resources, and human knowledge and is also known as the era of "great global convergence." Before this era began, the Europeans did not have direct access to the trading hubs of the Far East, Africa, and the Americas. The Europeans had traded with China but only through Muslim intermediaries and via the Great Silk Road. In the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, Europeans began a quest for tropical products and thus reached first Africa, then China through maritime routes, and eventually the Americas, dubbed at the time the "New World." This convergence of peoples across continents greatly changed the map of the earth as it existed. The convergence included population transfers, ecological and biological catastrophes but also new scientific discoveries that fundamentally affect us today. The Great Global Convergence of 1500s may rightly be described as the beginning of the modern world history."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Christian, David, Maps of Time: An Introduction to Big History. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004. Print.
  • Crosby, Alfred W., The Columbian Exchange: Biological and Cultural Consequences of 1492. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing, 1972. Print.
  • Curtin, Philip, D., Cross-Cultural Trade in World History. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1984. Print.
  • McNeill, J.R., & McNeill, William, H., The Human Web: A Bird's Eye View of World History. New York: Norton & Company, 2003. Print.
  • Stannard, David, E., American Holocaust: Columbus and Conquest of the New World. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992. Print.

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

The Great Global Convergence of the 1500s (2013, May 26) Retrieved October 22, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/the-great-global-convergence-of-the-1500s-153371/

MLA Format

"The Great Global Convergence of the 1500s" 26 May 2013. Web. 22 October. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/the-great-global-convergence-of-the-1500s-153371/>

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