Symbols in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" Analytical Essay by ResearchRiter

Symbols in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight"
A look at the symbolism used in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight."
# 122764 | 500 words | 2 sources | 2008 | US
Published on Dec 01, 2008 in Literature (English) , Literature (Poetry)


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Description:

This paper examines and discusses meaning and symbols in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight." These include the three blows from the Baron, the test of Gawain, and Gawain's response to the test and its outcome. The paper further argues that human nature is flawed but man can redeem himself even after sinning.

From the Paper:

"The story of 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight' is filled with many important symbols that speak to questions regarding social relations, chivalry, personal honor and the pursuit of fame and prestige. When the Baron, posing as the Green Knight, gives Sir Gawain three different strikes with an axe, he is sending an important message. The flinch is the first strike which causes the brave and valiant Gawain to swerve aside as the axe came gliding down..."

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Symbols in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" (2008, December 01) Retrieved October 03, 2022, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/symbols-in-sir-gawain-and-the-green-knight-122764/

MLA Format

"Symbols in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight"" 01 December 2008. Web. 03 October. 2022. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/symbols-in-sir-gawain-and-the-green-knight-122764/>

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