Status Of Women In Hinduism Analytical Essay by Top Papers

Status Of Women In Hinduism
An exploration of the status of women in Hinduism.
# 140590 | 2,250 words | 5 sources | MLA | 2003 | US


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Description:

This paper discusses how the women in Hinduism are treated as second class citizens and describes how although reforms have been introduced, there have been horrific reactions by fundamental extremists. The paper addresses the numeric inequality and explains the practice of terminating pregnancies of female babies. The paper further looks at the challenges facing females in gaining an education and in the workforce. The paper concludes that at present, the road ahead is long and the near term prognosis is unfortunately not favorable.

From the Paper:

"Hinduism is the oldest existing religion with nearly one billion followers, nearly 98.6% of who reside in India . Thus with the majority of Hindu women residing in India, the broad discussion of the status of women within this religion will center upon India, and the generalities that are draw reflect the Indian society at large, by extension reflect the status of women in Hinduism. The basic tenets of the role of women in Hinduism are certainly that of a second class citizen, women are not considered the equal of men. Women need to be controlled and under the protection of their husband, father, son or other male member of the family . This relegation to property status is further exemplified by the practice of arranged marriages. The marriages are generally arranged concurrently or soon after the girl reaches puberty, and she expected to respect, obey and worship her preselected mate, irrespective of his personal demeanor or lack of redeeming characteristics . The husband's duty is to protect his wife, however this protection certainly does not extend beyond the lifespan of the husband, the widow is expected not to remarry, regardless of her age."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Leazer, Mark. "Hinduism." Churchbenefits.com. Center for Interfaith Studies, Inc. 2007. <http://www.churchbenefits.org/documents/Hinduism_07.pdf> (September 23, 2008).
  • Ridge, Mark. "Anti-Christian Attacks Flare in India." CSMonitor.com. Christian Science Monitor. September 24, 2008. <http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0924/p07s03-wosc.html> (September 23, 2008).
  • Menon-Sen, Kalyani, Kumar, A K Shiva. "Women in India: How Free? How Equal?" UN.org. United Nation - India. 2001. <http://www.un.org.in/wii.htm> (September 23, 2008).
  • "United Nations Commission on the Status of Women: Report on the Fiftieth Session." UN.org. United Nations Economic and Social Council. 2006. <http://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/csw/csw50/documents.htm> (September 22, 2008).
  • Wallace, Corey. "Developing an Ecofeminist Ethic Within the Hindu Tradition." COFC.edu. College of Charleston. 2006. <http://www.cofc.edu/chrestomathy/vol5/wallace.pdf> (September 23, 2008)

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Status Of Women In Hinduism (2003, December 01) Retrieved June 03, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/status-of-women-in-hinduism-140590/

MLA Format

"Status Of Women In Hinduism" 01 December 2003. Web. 03 June. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/status-of-women-in-hinduism-140590/>

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