Solidarity and Globalization in the Twenty-First Century Analytical Essay by scribbler

An examination of Western perspectives on the sustainable economies in peasant societies.
# 152168 | 871 words | 3 sources | APA | 2012 | US
Published on Jan 08, 2013 in Economics (Globalization)


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Description:

The paper relates that in the "Moral Economy of Peasants", James C. Scott demonstrated how the solidarity infrastructure of Southeast Asian peasants are shaped by ethical values, while Samuel L. Popkin in "The Rational Peasant" criticizes Scott's view by implying that pre-industrial communities have not been contaminated by capitalism and as such have higher ethical values. The paper discusses how we see that the Western colonial systems and their corporate successors have not provided for the basic needs of the peasants and their sustainable economies. This author finds the Samuel L. Popkin book to be a more useful work and concludes that without the political economy involved, modern scholars find themselves applying a modern version of what can charitably called the "noble savage" viewpoint which is not very useful in understanding the peasant world and how they are coping with globalization.

From the Paper:

"In pre-industrial societies, mutual insurance networks have always been anomalous as far as many social scientists are concerned. In the Moral Economy of Peasants, James C. Scott demonstrated how the solidarity infrastructure of Southeast Asian peasants are shaped by ethical values. They believe in the bottom line of the right to subsistence and the principle of reciprocity. The big failure with this line of analysis is how these mutual insurance networks can survive in spite of incentive problems from governments to change them. As opposed to this, Samuel L. Popkin in The Rational Peasant is quick to criticize Scott's view by implying that pre-industrial communities have not been contaminated by capitalism and as such have higher ethical values. Popkin's contribution to this was to present a lot of evidence of opportunistic behavior among pre-capitalist peasants. This critique fell flat for not accounting for the well documented existence of these solidarity networks as economic entities.
"While the most common way that many observers see these two scholars as being fundamentally incompatible in the accounts of the peasant societies that they observed. Other scholars have argued that since these two authors' perspectives are actually much more similar that they are different. There is certainly more that the authors have in common than that they differ on."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Gold, Lorna. (2004). The Sharing economy: solidarity networks transforming globalisation. Ashgate : Burlington.
  • Popkin, Samuel L. (1979). The Rational peasant: the political economy of rural society in vietnam. Los Angeles: Univ. of California Press.
  • Scott, James C. (1976). The Moral economy of the peasant: rebellion and subsistence in southeast asia . Yale: Yale Univ. Press.

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Solidarity and Globalization in the Twenty-First Century (2013, January 08) Retrieved September 23, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/solidarity-and-globalization-in-the-twenty-first-century-152168/

MLA Format

"Solidarity and Globalization in the Twenty-First Century" 08 January 2013. Web. 23 September. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/solidarity-and-globalization-in-the-twenty-first-century-152168/>

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