Sir Gawain's Green Girdle: Shame or Honour? Analytical Essay

Sir Gawain's Green Girdle: Shame or Honour?
An exploration of the significance of the green girdle in the poem, "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight."
# 60479 | 1,175 words | 1 source | MLA | 2004 | CA
Published by on Aug 21, 2005 in Literature (English) , Literature (Poetry) , English (Analysis)


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Description:

This paper explores the symbolic significance of the green girdle in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight." The paper argues that the girdle is a symbol both of shame and of honor at the same time. This paradoxical interpretation makes sense in light of the great dichotomy that the poem sets up between Christian and pagan values, represented by the two loci of action: the court of King Arthur and the castle of the Green Knight. From a Christian point of view, the girdle is a symbol of shame; from a pagan point of view, it is a symbol of honor.

From the Paper:

"A key element in the poem "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" is the series of contrasts that are developed throughout the poem. Beauty and youth are contrasted with ugliness and old age (ll. 966-69), feasting with fasting (ll. 897-98), the dangers of the hunt with the comforts of the bedroom (ll. 1178-79), hospitality (ll. 835-37) with cruelty (ll. 2114-17). The most significant of these contrasts is that between shame and honor, the underlying theme of the poem."

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Sir Gawain's Green Girdle: Shame or Honour? (2005, August 21) Retrieved December 01, 2022, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/sir-gawain-green-girdle-shame-or-honour-60479/

MLA Format

"Sir Gawain's Green Girdle: Shame or Honour?" 21 August 2005. Web. 01 December. 2022. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/sir-gawain-green-girdle-shame-or-honour-60479/>

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