Reverberations of Woodstock and Altamont Analytical Essay by Nicky

Reverberations of Woodstock and Altamont
A historical analysis of the cultural impact of the Woodstock event and its lesser known counterpart, Altamont.
# 145388 | 3,552 words | 5 sources | MLA | 2010 | US


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Description:

This paper provides a historical analysis of the Woodstock and Altamont Rock Festivals. The paper explains that modern and topical interpretations of the rock and roll era, including but not limited to the culminating events at Woodstock and its less well-known cousin Altamont, are varied, demonstrating the idealism that drove such events as well as the reality of the so-called disarray and chaos that was realized by them. The paper asserts that the development of Woodstock, its realization and massive, record growth as well as Altamont's dire violence could be seen as the full circle of a movement that embraced drugs to "free the mind" and then used them to such an excess that their actions became much more indicative of destructive substance abuse. The paper concludes that the legacy of Woodstock should that of an elusive event that helped to bring the messages of the counterculture to light, as well as a reminder of what happens when planning is completely outstripped by reality.

Outline:
How Woodstock Changed the World
Woodstock or Altamont Define the Day
Historical and Cultural Significance
Symbolic Importance
Impact on the Region
Drugs
The Hippies
How to Remember Woodstock
Conclusion
Works Cited

From the Paper:

"Regardless of the personal impact that the movement had on individuals, both positive, negative and neutral the period marked a change in the world, and is treated as such both concurrently and in retrospective. The foundations that built Woodstock, ideals that challenged the status quo and the very visible and almost viral way in which Woodstock was organized and played out proved to many on both sides that mass movements could culminate in both positive and negative change that might never have been possible before, short of mass revolution."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Bracey, Gerald W. "April Foolishness: The 20th Anniversary of A Nation at Risk." Phi Delta Kappan 84, no. 8 (2003): 616. Database on-line. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001906448. Internet. Accessed 15 December 2008.
  • "Rock Music." In The Columbia Encyclopedia 6th ed., edited by Lagasse, Paul. New York: Columbia University Press, 2007. Database on-line. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=112882962. Internet. Accessed 15 December 2008.
  • Curtis, Jim. Rock Eras: Interpretations of Music and Society, 1954-1984. Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1987. Book on-line. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101550428. Internet. Accessed 15 December 2008.
  • Lauro, Jason. "Memory of a Free Festival." World and I, August 1999, 232. Database on-line. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002320964. Internet. Accessed 15 December 2008.
  • Reese, Joel. "Delightful Documentary Captures Carefree Time, Thrilling Concerts." Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL) (2004): 44. Database on-line. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5006807654. Internet. Accessed 15 December 2008.

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Reverberations of Woodstock and Altamont (2010, November 07) Retrieved November 18, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/reverberations-of-woodstock-and-altamont-145388/

MLA Format

"Reverberations of Woodstock and Altamont" 07 November 2010. Web. 18 November. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/reverberations-of-woodstock-and-altamont-145388/>

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