Research and Ethics: The Tuskegee Syphilis Study Analytical Essay by Nicky

Research and Ethics: The Tuskegee Syphilis Study
Research on how medical ethics, or lack thereof, related to the Tuskegee syphilis experiments.
# 128548 | 1,492 words | 4 sources | APA | 2010 | US


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Description:

This paper focuses on the Tuskegee syphilis experiments, and how the study related to medical research ethics. The paper explains that the reason Tuskegee studies are widely known is not because they led to ground-breaking advances in the treatment of syphilis, but because the studies were conducted on human participants who had not given informed consent, and resulted in needless pain and suffering for most of those subjects. The paper notes that one of the most remarkable aspects of the Tuskegee study is that, of all the doctors, nurses, government officials, and other workers who knew about the study, no one called a halt to it; however, the study ended due to the actions of one whistle-blower, Jean Heller. The paper discusses the original intentions of the study, and its subsequent alteration and devolvement into deplorable actions. The paper's author opines that the involved doctors should have been reported to ethics committees and prosecuted for fraud and assault, for putting the patients through needless rounds of unnecessary medical tests.

Outline:
Introduction
Patient Consent
Benefits of the Research
Potential Roles of Ethics Committees
Potential Responsibilities of Management
Personal Management Approach
References

From the Paper:

"What makes the Tuskegee study even more appalling is the fact that it had absolutely no scientific benefit. The study was meant to determine if syphilis affected blacks differently than it affected whites, with the hypothesis that blacks would suffer more cardiovascular effects and that whites would have more cognitive effects. However, the study did not compare a group of untreated blacks to untreated whites, making it impossible to compare the two groups. The "scientific protocol had been shoddy from the start. Since the men had in fact received some medication for syphilis in the beginning of the study, however inadequate, it thereby corrupted the outcome of a study of 'untreated syphilis.'" (Brunner, 2008)."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Brunner, B. (2008). The Tuskegee syphilis experiment. Retrieved November 5, 2008 from Tuskegee University Web site: http://www.tuskegee.edu/Global/Story.asp?s=1207586
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2008). U.S. Public Health Service syphilis study at Tuskegee: Home. Retrieved November 5, 2008, from Centers for Disease ControlWeb site: http://www.cdc.gov/tuskegee/index.html
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2008). U.S. Public Health Service syphilis study at Tuskegee: Timeline. Retrieved November 5, 2008, from Centers for Disease ControlWeb site: http://www.cdc.gov/tuskegee/timeline.htm
  • Office of Research Support. (2006). Ethical principles (The Belmont report). Retrieved November 5, 2008, from Duke UniversityWeb site: http://www.ors.duke.edu/irb/regpolicy/ethical.html

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Research and Ethics: The Tuskegee Syphilis Study (2010, July 27) Retrieved June 06, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/research-and-ethics-the-tuskegee-syphilis-study-128548/

MLA Format

"Research and Ethics: The Tuskegee Syphilis Study" 27 July 2010. Web. 06 June. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/research-and-ethics-the-tuskegee-syphilis-study-128548/>

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