Race and Labor Force in Three Occupations Analytical Essay by Nicky

Race and Labor Force in Three Occupations
An analysis of the racial and gender differences in the fields of accounting, waiter/waitressing and painting.
# 151084 | 957 words | 3 sources | MLA | 2012 | US
Published on May 21, 2012 in Business (Accounting) , Business (Human Resources)


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Description:

This paper reviews statistics in three fields - accounting, waiter/waitressing and commercial painters - to determine the percentage of accountants, waiters/waitresses and painters that are White Americans, African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans and Hispanic Americans and to point out the gender division of these career fields. The paper then analyzes these findings in light of the articles written on race/ethnicity by Kirschenman and Neckerman, Newman and Ellis and Kandel and Parrado.

Outline:
Introduction
Statistical Information for Accountants
Comparison of Waiters/Waitressing and Painters to Accounting Ethnic and Gender Statistics
Analysis
Conclusion

From the Paper:

"In the field of waiters/waitressing, the total number of employees was about the same as those who were accountants. In 1990, the U.S. Census Bureau reported 1,488,253 waiters and waitresses. However, the difference in gender spread across this occupation is significantly different from that of accountants. Where accountants were fairly evenly divided between men and women, waiting tables is clearly skewed towards female employees. Eighty percent of waiters/waitresses were female, according to the U.S. Census Bureau's report. Racially, the percentages were more in line with those found in the field of accounting.
"Eighty-eight percent of those in the waiter/waitressing field reported being White. This is in comparison to 86% of accountants reporting to be White. Just over 5.4 percent of waiters/waitresses reported themselves as African American, compared to 6.7% of Black accountants. Seven-tenths of a percent of waiters/waitresses reported American Indian ethnicity, 4.3% reported being Asian American, and 7.9% reported being Hispanic American. These figures are compared to 3/10%, 5.4% and 4.2% of accountants reporting being American Indian, Asian American and Hispanic American respectively. These ethnicity breakdowns are incredibly similar to those found in the field of accounting and continue to be found in the field of commercial painting."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Kandel, W. and Parrado, E. "Hispanics in the American South and the Transformation of the Poultry Industry" in Rethinking the Color Line: Readings in Race and Ethnicity. Boston: Mcgraw-Hill, 2008.
  • Kirschenman, J. and Neckerman, K. "We'd Love to Hire Them, But..." in Rethinking the Color Line: Readings in Race and Ethnicity. Boston: Mcgraw-Hill, 2008.
  • Newman, K. and Ellis, C. "There's No Shame in My Game." in Rethinking the Color Line: Readings in Race and Ethnicity. Boston: Mcgraw-Hill, 2008.

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Race and Labor Force in Three Occupations (2012, May 21) Retrieved February 23, 2024, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/race-and-labor-force-in-three-occupations-151084/

MLA Format

"Race and Labor Force in Three Occupations" 21 May 2012. Web. 23 February. 2024. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/race-and-labor-force-in-three-occupations-151084/>

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