Paternalism in Latin America Analytical Essay

Paternalism in Latin America
A historic and analytical overview of paternalism in Latin American history.
# 147664 | 3,613 words | 25 sources | MLA | 2011 | US


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Description:

In this article, the writer discusses that incidences of paternalism, control by those in power to mold the lower classes into a way of living deemed or advertised as better than their current status, in Latin America are not only deviations from the them-vs.-us portrait of class struggle. The writer maintains that paternalism complicates and deepens the reality of class relations itself by at times intensifying the exploitation of elite goals, and at other times offering the lower classes genuine help from the above. Often, though, the effects of paternalism have been somewhere in between, both building bridges and burning them in the war between classes. In analyzing the motives behind paternalistic actions and rhetoric, whether they derive from need for control or power, or a genuine conception or misconception of how to improve the lives of the lower class, the writer discusses that the reasons behind paternalistic efforts have been varied and unclear, while the effects of these efforts have touched all aspects of social, economic and political identity in Latin America. What is certain is the fact that coercion in the form of protectoral or friendly overtures by those with power to those without, along with the motives behind these overtures, have greatly shaped the dialogue of class conflict in Latin America, both clashing with and facilitating the more forceful and violent aspects of class struggle that eventually erupted.

From the Paper:

"Thus, the effect of paternalism on labor relations is twofold. Paternalistic policies kept wages low and class divisions strongly intact. Its failure to truly convince workers that industrialists' methods were for the amelioration of the lower class, paired with the inequality of the clear class divisions that it had built, then facilitated and forced the revolution from below, the will of the lower class to change their own destiny and to decide on their own how to ameliorate their lives. When paternalism is backed by motives of control, the lower class will inevitably see through those efforts. Indeed, the existence of paternalism paired with its failure to control the lower classes forced labor to take matters into their own hands, to continue class struggle through outright methods of striking, thereby informing outright class struggle beyond levels of coercion. Indeed, it was workers formed by paternalistic factory systems that led the strikes of the early twentieth century, paving the way for increased class-consciousness in the generation of their children and grandchildren.

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Simpson, Leslie The Encomienda in New Spain: The Beginning of Spanish Mexico, Copyright 1950, page 1
  • Simpson, Leslie The Encomienda in New Spain: The Beginning of Spanish Mexico, Copyright 1950, page 12: Isabella declared that "The Indians be not mistreated ... and they are to be paid wages... and they are to be used with their consent and not otherwise"
  • Bauer, Arnold J. Goods, Power and History: Latin America's Material Culture, Cambridge University Press 2001, pg. 9
  • Bauer, Arnold J. Goods, Power and History: Latin America's Material Culture, Cambridge University Press 2001, pg 50
  • Bauer, Arnold J. Goods, Power and History: Latin America's Material Culture, Cambridge University Press 2001, pg 9

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Paternalism in Latin America (2011, June 01) Retrieved September 23, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/paternalism-in-latin-america-147664/

MLA Format

"Paternalism in Latin America" 01 June 2011. Web. 23 September. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/paternalism-in-latin-america-147664/>

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