Observing Lydia Analytical Essay by scribbler

Observing Lydia
Comments on observing a child's interactions based on Piaget's theories.
# 152030 | 1,481 words | 1 source | APA | 2012 | US
Published on Nov 13, 2012 in Psychology (Child and Adolescent) , Psychology (Piaget) , Psychology (Theory)


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Description:

This paper records the observations of a child named Lydia and her interactions and problem solving skills at a park. The analysis was made by a family friend who based them on Jean Piaget's development theories. First, the paper describes some scenarios that Lydia encountered at the playground. These are tied in to Piaget's theories and further notes how Lydia's developmental phase corresponds with them. Additionally, the paper gives some information about Lydia's family, citing that they are upper-middle class. Next, the paper relates the activities that Lydia was involved in at the park, including some conflicts with other children and how they were resolved. In particular, the author posits that Lydia is in the preoperational phase of development. The paper concludes with the author stating that Lydia seems to have high problem solving skills, perhaps above those of most of her peers.

From the Paper:

"This is a likely scenario when examining it within the context of Piaget's description of the preoperational period, which is where Lydia falls developmentally (2-6 years old). In this stage, according to Piaget, children are not fully skilled at problem solving or at attempts to fully understand the world around them. Therefore it is possible that Lydia's verbal and motor skills are ahead of her social skills, which could cause her to try to 'make trouble'. The girls she was taunting did not seem bothered and made a few "nuh uh" and "whatever" type comments and then continued with their activity as if Lydia was not there. Lydia then quickly tired of the swinging and moved on.
"Her next activity was the slide, which presented another example of Lydia trying to fit in with the older children, but failing at the task. There was a young boy whom I would estimate to be around six years old who was, with two other boys and one girl, all of whom seemed to be around eight years old, getting in line repeatedly to go down the big slide. Several times, I saw the older children push Lydia out of the way and climb the ladder to the slide in front of her when it was her turn."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Piaget, J. (1963). Psychological intelligence. Patterson, N.J. Littlefield Adams Publishers.

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Observing Lydia (2012, November 13) Retrieved July 10, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/observing-lydia-152030/

MLA Format

"Observing Lydia" 13 November 2012. Web. 10 July. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/observing-lydia-152030/>

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