Literary Conventions in African-American Literature Analytical Essay by Kella

Literary Conventions in African-American Literature
An analysis of the literary conventions and themes present in African-American literature.
# 153637 | 1,247 words | 4 sources | APA | 2013 | US
Published on Aug 01, 2013 in Literature (American) , African-American Studies (General)


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Description:

The paper analyzes the literary conventions and themes in African-American literature as well as the storytelling conventions that are utilized by African-American authors. The paper also discusses the historical, socio-political and cultural events that influence the literature as well as the reader. The author of this paper opines that African-American literature allows readers to open the doors to learning and understanding more about an ethnic group who suffered greatly and fought to gain rights that many groups took for granted.

Outline:
Literary Conventions and Themes
Storytelling Conventions
Historical, Socio-political, and Cultural Influences
Conclusion

From the Paper:

"Literary conventions are elements that identify a specific genre of literature through elements commonly associated with that genre. The use of different literary conventions helps the author convey specific points within the literature. Jourdon Anderson's "To my old Master," Marriah Hines' "My White Folks Treated us Good," and Al Young's "Somebody Done Hoodoo'd the Hoodoo Man" are autobiographies that allow each author to present a little piece of his or her past to the reader (Young, 1996) . The use of first person perspective is associated with autobiographies because the author is telling the reader about a part of his or her past. Each of these authors also provides vivid details in their writing, both in the characters involved as well as in the setting and events that occur. Anderson explains his current living situation in great detail to help his old master understand his worth and what his master had lost, including that he now works for pay, his children are educated, and his family is respected by those he works for (Anderson, 1865). A touch of satire throughout his letter guides the reader to believe that Anderson may also be laughing at his old boss a little because he is finally realizing how much Anderson and his family were worth since he lost them."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Anderson, J. (1865). "To my old Master."Retrieved from Young, A. (1996).African American literature.A brief introduction and anthology. New York, NY: Addison-Wesley.
  • Hines, M. (n.d.). "My White Folks Treated Us Good." Retrieved from Young, A. (1996).African American literature.A brief introduction and anthology. New York, NY: Addison-Wesley.
  • Young, A. (1996). African American literature.A brief introduction and anthology. New York, NY: Addison-Wesley.
  • Young, A. (1967). "Somebody Done Hoodoo'd the Hoodoo Man." Retrieved from Young, A. (1996).African American literature.A brief introduction and anthology. New York, NY: Addison-Wesley.

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Literary Conventions in African-American Literature (2013, August 01) Retrieved July 19, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/literary-conventions-in-african-american-literature-153637/

MLA Format

"Literary Conventions in African-American Literature" 01 August 2013. Web. 19 July. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/literary-conventions-in-african-american-literature-153637/>

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