Isolation in Literature Analytical Essay by serendipity

Isolation in Literature
A look at the theme of isolation in William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" and Carson McCullers's "The Ballad of the Sad Cafe".
# 49231 | 1,987 words | 3 sources | MLA | 2004 | US
Published on Feb 29, 2004 in English (Analysis) , Literature (Comparative Literature)


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Description:

Isolation is a word that denotes loneliness and being alone. This is not merely a physical condition, but can be a state of mind, as well. This paper discusses the stories of William Faulkner, "A Rose for Emily", and McCullers's, "The Ballad of the Sad Caf?", in which this theme is highlighted. It shows how both writers create protagonists that are isolated due to their thoughts and struggles in the course of life, rather than solely by society and the constraints it puts on people.

From the Paper:

"Isolation is a harsh word that brings up an image of a person living alone in the desert or equally far away place that has little human habitation. The word is rarely used for people living in the middle of a social town or city for it seems impossible that a person could be alone in the midst of a relatively large population. Yet, some people refuse to accept that their lives must be inexplicably linked with the others who live amongst the society for humans are not social animals for recreation purposes, though that is an added advantage, the fact is humans are social for survival. For without the human touch even an infant slowly dies. Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner is a story of a woman who seems to be lost in her search for love and companionship, through out her life."

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Isolation in Literature (2004, February 29) Retrieved April 08, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/isolation-in-literature-49231/

MLA Format

"Isolation in Literature" 29 February 2004. Web. 08 April. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/isolation-in-literature-49231/>

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