International Relations Analytical Essay by Neatwriter

International Relations
An analysis of the realist theory of international relations.
# 61897 | 1,514 words | 3 sources | MLA | 2004 | US
Published on Oct 31, 2005 in English (Analysis) , International Relations (General) , Political Science (General)


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Description:

This paper contends that the main ideal of realism is that the state is the main and most important role player in the political arena with regard to international relations. The paper explains that many states are involved in international relations and as such, each state is centrally governed by its own self-interest. The paper claims that this self-interest is furthermore not curbed by a central governing body in world politics and each state basically chooses its own methods and means of securing its own values of self-interest and security.

Outline
Introduction
International Relations and Conflict
The Values of the State
The Anarchic System
Conclusion

From the Paper:

"Basic ethics related to humanity and human relations are therefore ignored in international relations, since the value system is embedded in self-interest. The state is allowed to act in whichever way is deemed fit for its own survival and for national security. The balance of power is then seen as equal to peace. An imbalance of power on the other hand is what frequently leads to anarchy. A country may for example become disproportionately powerful. Being primarily self-interested and power seeking, weaker states would then perceive this as a threat and take preemptive hostile action without actual provocation. It is this tendency to react against perceived rather than actual threat that also leads to the realist concept of political anarchy in international relations."

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

International Relations (2005, October 31) Retrieved April 17, 2024, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/international-relations-61897/

MLA Format

"International Relations" 31 October 2005. Web. 17 April. 2024. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/international-relations-61897/>

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