"Hamlet" ( Shakespeare ) Analytical Essay by The Research Group

"Hamlet" ( Shakespeare )
Examines the meaning and significance of Act III, Scene 2, in which Hamlet speaks to and deceives Horatio, his would-be killers Rosencrantz and Guildenstern and others.
# 14757 | 1,350 words | 1 source | 1999 | US
Published on Jul 15, 2003 in Drama and Theater (English) , Literature (English) , English (Analysis) , Shakespeare (Hamlet)


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Description:

"The central character in Hamlet is charged with a duty to avenge his father, but in the broader sense, he is to avenge the natural order and so restore it. That natural order has been rent asunder by the murder of the king, and Hamlet is the instrument of divine justice who is told to destroy Claudius and Gertrude and so to set things right.

From the Paper:

"The central character in Hamlet is charged with a duty to avenge his father, but in the broader sense, he is to avenge the natural order and so restore it. That natural order has been rent asunder by the murder of the king, and Hamlet is the instrument of divine justice who is told to destroy Claudius and Gertrude and so to set things right. Yet, Hamlet does not act immediately, and instead he devises his ploy of a play-within-a-play and also toys with various characters as he prepares his revenge. One such instance of this occurs when he is speaking to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern in Act III Scene 2, two men who are ostensibly his friends and yet who have been ordered by Claudius to kill Hamlet. He knows this, and they do not now that he is aware of the fact. The banter in this scene therefore has a double meaning throughout, and Hamlet takes delight in confusing ..."

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