Frederick Douglass' "My Bondage and My Freedom" Analytical Essay by Neatwriter

Frederick Douglass' "My Bondage and My Freedom"
This paper compares the writings of George Washington, J. Hector St. John Crevecoeur and Theodore Roosevelt to the writings of Frederick Douglass as expressed in his book "My Bondage and My Freedom".
# 60241 | 1,275 words | 3 sources | MLA | 2005 | US
Published on Aug 14, 2005 in Literature (American) , English (Analysis) , African-American Studies (General)


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Description:

This paper explains that the hard work and sense of freedom mentioned by writers like Washington, Crevecoeur and others differs markedly from what Douglass says about the American ideal; this fact is not surprising because Douglass and his immediate ancestors did not come to America on their own but were removed by force from their native land and made to work as slaves. The author points out that Douglass never sees himself as an American because, as a slave, he was kept him from belonging to any society of free men until he left slavery and entered a new world. The paper relates that Douglass moved from one oppressed minority to another--the free slave constituting another oppressed group, but this did not make Douglass any less an American in cultural terms but never as the ideal and fully connected American referred to by Washington and Crevecoeur.

From the Paper:

"Douglass himself, however, suggests otherwise in some of hits statements, such as when he writes in an 1846 letter to Garrison that he has no nation of his own. This sense of not having a nation is clearly part of the life of early Americans who, at the time of the Revolutionary War, denied their ties to Britain and sought to create a nation because they did not have one. In the American tradition, Douglass harks back to this same idea, emerging as he did from a slave world where he had no nation, and then finding ways to recreate both himself and his ties with the country over time. His writings are clearly American as they express a similar dedication to certain core values which, admittedly, the nation has not always lived up to, as it should."

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Frederick Douglass' "My Bondage and My Freedom" (2005, August 14) Retrieved August 15, 2022, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/frederick-douglass-my-bondage-and-my-freedom-60241/

MLA Format

"Frederick Douglass' "My Bondage and My Freedom"" 14 August 2005. Web. 15 August. 2022. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/frederick-douglass-my-bondage-and-my-freedom-60241/>

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