For the Good of All: Family and Community in "Antigone" Analytical Essay by nfcolbert

For the Good of All: Family and Community in "Antigone"
An analysis of Creon's fatal flaw in Sophocles' "Antigone" and its negative impact on his family and community.
# 152408 | 1,238 words | 2 sources | MLA | 2010 | US
Published on Feb 07, 2013 in Literature (Greek and Roman) , Drama and Theater (Greek and Roman)


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Description:

The paper discusses how Antigone acts in a way to preserve the sanctity of her family and Ismene does not view Antigone as the enemy, and appeals to Creon on the basis of family loyalty to be lenient to Antigone. The paper goes on to discuss how Creon's actions were initially intended to satisfy his citizens, to show them that he was a strong, fair ruler who punished those deserving of punishment, however, it soon becomes clear that the citizens do not support Creon's action, nor do they condemn Antigone's. The paper explains that even though people no longer support Creon, but he does not care, and this reveals his own selfish pride--he will accomplish his goal of punishing those who were traitors in his eyes even without the support of his people. The paper highlights how Creon's doom lies in knowing that he destroyed not only his family, but his city and his citizens, all for the sake of his fatal flaw, his willful pride.

From the Paper:

"Antigone acts in a way to preserve the sanctity of her family. The family is one that has been riddled with tragedy, from her mother and father's incestuous relationship to the death of her brothers at one another's hands. In her symbolic act of burial, Antigone seeks to restore dignity to Polynices, and by extension, to her blood family. Antigone appeals to her sister Ismene using the blood ties, asking her "own flesh and blood" (Antigone 1) to aid her in the burial of Polynices, declaring that Ismene's decisions will reveal her to be worth her breeding, or reveal her to be a coward not worthy of her "royal blood" (Antigone 44-45). Ismene rejects Antigone's pleas, to which Antigone replies "you will make me hate you" ((Antigone 108). Ismene's unwillingness to die for family royalty makes her Antigone's enemy.
"However, Ismene does not view Antigone as the enemy, and appeals to Creon on the basis of family loyalty to be lenient to Antigone. "How can I live alone, without her?" Ismene cries, to which Creon replies "Her?/Don't even mention her--she no longer exists" (Antigone 639-640). Ismene then appeals to Creon's duty as a father, asking if he would sacrifice his own son's happiness, to which he responds "Absolutley:/there are other fields for him to plow" (Antigone 641-643)."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Knox, Bernard. Introduction. The Three Theban Plays. Trans. Robert Fagles. New York: Penguin Books, 1982. Print.
  • Sophocles . Antigone. The Three Theban Plays. Trans. Robert Fagles. New York: Penguin Books, 1982. Print.

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

For the Good of All: Family and Community in "Antigone" (2013, February 07) Retrieved February 16, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/for-the-good-of-all-family-and-community-in-antigone-152408/

MLA Format

"For the Good of All: Family and Community in "Antigone"" 07 February 2013. Web. 16 February. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/for-the-good-of-all-family-and-community-in-antigone-152408/>

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