Evaluating the Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy (CAPS) Analytical Essay by scribbler

Evaluating the Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy (CAPS)
A review and discussion on the 2004 evaluation of the Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy (CAPS).
# 152833 | 1,619 words | 2 sources | APA | 2013 | US
Published on Apr 30, 2013 in Criminology (Public and Crime)


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Description:

The paper explains that Chicago has been torn by unrest for much of its history, often due to tensions between police and citizens, and the Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy (CAPS) program was designed to improve community relations by creating an image of the police that was responsive to local concerns. The paper examines the 2004 evaluation of the CAPS program in detail and discusses the present lack of interest in this program that indicates that more extensive data about residents' satisfaction with specific aspects of the program, rather than numerical data about attendance, should have been recorded in the 2004 evaluation. The paper concludes that the current state of the CAPS program exemplifies the difficulty of conducting effective program evaluations, when so many additional factors can impact program success.

Outline:
Introduction
CAPS: 2004 program evaluation findings
CAPS today: A sharp decline in success

From the Paper:

"Historically, tensions have run high between the Chicago police and the city's population of low-income, historically discriminated-against minority groups. Rather than seeing the police as a protective force, Chicago residents were apt to regard them in a hostile fashion, The Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy (CAPS) was inaugurated in April 1993 as a kind of alternative, community-based strategy to enhance the safety of Chicagoans and improve their perceptions of the city police. Chicago has been torn by unrest for much of its history, often due to simmering (and boiling) tensions between police and citizens and the CAPS program was designed to improve community relations by creating an image of the police that was responsive to local concerns.
"The program did not aim to reduce the vigilance of the police, rather it attempted to increase the police presence in a manner designed to demonstrate the fact that the police were interested in protecting the neighborhood's residents. Localization was an important part of the initiative: "Part of the plan was to renew the Police Department's turf orientation, so teams of officers now have relatively long-term assignments in each of the city's 279 police beats. They are expected to spend most of their time responding to calls and working on prevention projects in their assigned area" wrote the Chicago Community Policing Evaluation Consortium in 2004, in its program evaluation of CAPS (Skogan & Steiner 2004, p. i)."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Shift expected at Chicago's community policing program. (2010, September 17). Progress Illinois. Retrieved September 24, 2010 athttp://www.progressillinois.com/quick-hits/content/2010/09/17/shift-expected-chicagos-community-policing-program
  • Skogan, Wesley G. & Lynn Steiner (2004, April). Community Policing in Chicago: Year Ten.Prepared by the Chicago Community Policing Evaluation Consortium. Retrieved September 24, 2010 athttp://www.northwestern.edu/ipr/publications/policing_papers/Yr10-CAPSeval.pdf

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Evaluating the Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy (CAPS) (2013, April 30) Retrieved January 21, 2022, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/evaluating-the-chicago-alternative-policing-strategy-caps-152833/

MLA Format

"Evaluating the Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy (CAPS)" 30 April 2013. Web. 21 January. 2022. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/evaluating-the-chicago-alternative-policing-strategy-caps-152833/>

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