Escapes Great and Small: Fleeing from Reality in Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya" Analytical Essay

Escapes Great and Small: Fleeing from Reality in Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya"
An analysis of Anton Chekhov's play, "Uncle Vanya", supporting the interpretation that it is actually an adaptation of another play of his entitled "The Wood Demon".
# 153872 | 5,895 words | 11 sources | MLA | 2014 | CA
Published by on May 25, 2014 in Drama and Theater (World) , Literature (Russian)


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Description:

This paper presents an in-depth analysis of Anton Chekhov's play, "Uncle Vanya", and contends that in reworking another of his plays, entitled "The Wood Demon", into "Uncle Vanya", Chekhov shifted from the social to the psychological level, intending to throw into high relief the defense (or escape) mechanisms that ordinary people employ when confronted with a reality they are unable to cope with.

Table of Contents:
Introduction
The Case for a Psychological Reading of the Play
Defense Mechanisms: The Escape from Reality
Conclusion

From the Paper:

"Besides the escapes mentioned above, other escapes abound in Uncle Vanya. Vanya himself finds Escape in Romantic Fantasies, pursuing love as "an agency of salvation" (Gilamn 115). His love for Yelena is just such an escape, since he knows there is no chance of her ever reciprocating his love, and furthermore, he despises her indolence and is irritated by her philosophizing. Still, he pursues her, fantasizing in Act II about how he would comfort her during a thunderstorm (Six Plays 193). In these brief moments of fantasy he finds happiness, however fleeting. But Vanya also escapes by means of regression: the Escape into Childhood. In his most anguished moment in the play, after his confrontation with the Professor, he turns for one brief moment to his mother "almost as a small child" (Peace 66) for sympathy and advice with his pathetic plea, "Mother, what am I to do?" (Six Plays 212). But this maternal sympathy is not forthcoming, and the regression quickly reverses. A similar regression is going on simultaneously with Sonya, who turns to the old nurse for comfort. Sonya, however, stays in regression much longer, snuggling closer to Marina (Six Plays 213)."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Bentley, Eric. "Craftsmanship in Uncle Vanya." Chekhov: New Perspectives. Ed. by Rene and Nonna D. Wellek. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1984.
  • Bristow, Eugene K. Anton Chekhov's Plays. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1977.
  • Corrigan, Robert W., ed. Six Plays of Chekhov. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1962.
  • Gilman, Richard. Chekhov's Plays: An Opening into Eternity. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995.
  • Karlinsky, Simon. "Chekhov: The Gentle Subversive." Chekhov: New Perspectives. Ed. by Rene and Nonna D. Wellek. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1984.

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Escapes Great and Small: Fleeing from Reality in Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya" (2014, May 25) Retrieved May 26, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/escapes-great-and-small-fleeing-from-reality-in-chekhov-uncle-vanya-153872/

MLA Format

"Escapes Great and Small: Fleeing from Reality in Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya"" 25 May 2014. Web. 26 May. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/escapes-great-and-small-fleeing-from-reality-in-chekhov-uncle-vanya-153872/>

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