Edith Wharton's "Roman Fever" and Zora Neale Hurston's "The Gilded Six-Bits" Analytical Essay by Emily

Edith Wharton's "Roman Fever" and Zora Neale Hurston's "The Gilded Six-Bits"
This paper contrasts and compares Edith Wharton's "Roman Fever" and Zora Neale Hurston's "The Gilded Six-Bits."
# 4965 | 2,605 words | 7 sources | MLA | 2001 | US


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Description:

This paper is a look at Edith Wharton's, "Roman Fever," and Zora Neale Hurston's "The Gilded Six-Bits." Edith Wharton was a white American woman of opulence and class, while Zola Neale Hurston was an African-American who was born in Eatonville, Florida, occupied primarily by black families who have historically been struggling for economic sufficiency and comfort, but have historically been hampered by racial prejudice. The paper looks at how the two celebrated authors write about love, marriage and family, women and their overt well as covert emotions and desires, with the authors' respective and opposing cultures and social classes as backdrops.

From the Paper:

"Both stories deal with marriage. In Wharton's, the marriages of childhood friends Alida and Grace had to be cultivated, for they belonged to the genteel class of human beings at that time. They had to try all means to feign happiness and of being loved and their mates' fidelity to them. How they looked to the outside world weighed much more than how they really felt inside, and that was the core of Victorian values of propriety the external, heartbreaking, mind-blowing type. This was the price to pay for belonging up there and everything that went with being high above. In contrast, Hurston's characters, Joe and his Missy May, treasured their marriage and had a common line of pleasures, including the pursuit of a few gilded coins, chocolate kisses and a baby. Their simple joys were more accessible and this made marriage more workable and forgiving offenses possible. Although both authors had unhappy marriages, Hurston nevertheless valued marriage as an institution that could save an individual or else saw marriage as a stabilizing force like nothing else in a society."

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Edith Wharton's "Roman Fever" and Zora Neale Hurston's "The Gilded Six-Bits" (2002, May 30) Retrieved September 27, 2022, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/edith-wharton-roman-fever-and-zora-neale-hurston-the-gilded-six-bits-4965/

MLA Format

"Edith Wharton's "Roman Fever" and Zora Neale Hurston's "The Gilded Six-Bits"" 30 May 2002. Web. 27 September. 2022. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/edith-wharton-roman-fever-and-zora-neale-hurston-the-gilded-six-bits-4965/>

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