Descartes and Regius Analytical Essay by Righter

Descartes and Regius
An analysis of the philosophy of Rene Descartes and Henri de Roy (Henricus Regius)regarding Cartesian dualism.
# 153826 | 2,228 words | 3 sources | MLA | 2014 | US
Published on Feb 18, 2014 in Philosophy (History)


$19.95 Buy and instantly download this paper now

Description:

This paper provides a brief history of the relationship between Descartes and Henri de Roy (Henricus Regius). The paper summarizes Regius' position in his broadsheet, and Descartes' arguments in his work, "Comments on a Certain Broadsheet". The paper then discusses the problem of defining man as an "ens per accidens". Finally, the paper addresses the soul/body problem and the "myth" of Cartesian dualism.

Outline:
Part 1: Introduction
Part 2: Comments on a Certain Broadsheet
Part 3: The Human Being: An Ens Per Accidens or Ens Per Se?
Part 4: My Meditation

From the Paper:

"It is a curious yet very common phenomenon: two people who are the closest of friends
become after some time the bitterest enemies. Such was the case with Rene Descartes and Henri de Roy (Henricus Regius). For some time, Regius was an avid follower of Descartes, and was considered by most people to be a tried and true Cartesian. Descartes more than approved of Regius' teachings of his philosophy at the University of Utrecht, openly showering him with praises. For example, Descartes stated at one point that he was "so confident of his (Regius') intelligence" that he did not think Regius held any views that he would not gladly have acknowledged as his own. Descartes' laudatory language soon began to subside, however. What started the feud between the two thinkers was Regius' claim - in his doctoral thesis - that man is an ens per accidens. That is, according to Regius, the union between soul and body - that which composes a human being - is not a necessary connection, but rather an accidental one. Descartes, after reading Regius' thesis and noticing this claim, wrote the following to Regius: "In your theses you say that a human being is an ens per accidens. You could scarcely have said anything more objectionable and provocative.""

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Descartes, Rene. John Cottingham, et. al, translators. The Philosophical Writings of Descartes: Volume 1. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. 1985.
  • Descartes, Rene. John Cottingham, et. al, translators. The Philosophical Writings of Descartes: Volume 2. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. 1984.
  • Descartes, Rene. John Cottingham, et. al, translators. The Philosophical Writings of Descartes: Volume 3. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. 1991.

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Descartes and Regius (2014, February 18) Retrieved October 22, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/descartes-and-regius-153826/

MLA Format

"Descartes and Regius" 18 February 2014. Web. 22 October. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/descartes-and-regius-153826/>

Comments