Crake's Complexities in Margaret Atwood's "Oryx and Crake" Analytical Essay by scribbler

Crake's Complexities in Margaret Atwood's "Oryx and Crake"
An analysis of how Crake's humanoid race, the Crakers, offer insight into his personality in Margaret Atwood's "Oryx and Crake".
# 152142 | 1,198 words | 3 sources | MLA | 2012 | US
Published on Jan 04, 2013 in Literature (Canadian)


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Description:

The paper discusses Crake's creation of his own human race and analyzes the motives behind his own version of utopia. The paper shows how Crake has an idealistic vision of how the world should be and he wants to make a positive change, yet his humanoids are ignorant, suggesting that he desires a "god-like" status. The paper discusses how he shapes the Crakers' physical and mental characteristics in a way to fulfill his own desire for power and his need to come to terms with his sexual past.

From the Paper:

"Oryx and Crake is full of rich, complex characters who undergo the same struggles mankind faces in the present day. Glenn, later known as Crake, is a complicated character with motives that are difficult to interpret. However, his humanoid race, the Crakers, are concrete signs that offer some insight into Crake's personality. Crake's creation of his own human race can indicate several motives: he has idealistic vision of how the world should be and wants to make a positive change, yet his humanoids are ignorant, suggesting that he desires a "god-like" status, which is can further proven by the way he shapes the Crakers' physical and mental characteristics. To understand Crake, it is crucial to analyze the motives behind the creation of his own version of utopia.
"Crake could have created a new world and the Crakers because he genuinely wanted to make a positive change. Crake creates the humanoids in hopes of a new, improved quality of life for a race, but what are his motives? It is unclear whether or not Crake really wants a changed world for the greater good, or if he is seeking power. The Crakers are a solid, physical manifestation of Crake's desire to change the world in what he deems to be a positive way."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Atwood, Margaret. Orxy and Crake. New York: Nan A. Talese, 2003.
  • DiMarco, Danette. "Paradice Lost, Paradice Regained: homo faber and the Makings of a New Beginning in Oryx and Crake." Utopian Studies 41.2 (2005): 170-195. Web. 31 Mar. 2010.
  • Ku, Chung-Hao. "Of Monster and Man: Transgenics and Transgression in Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake." Concentric: Literary and Cultural Studies 32.1 (2006): 107-33. Print.

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

Crake's Complexities in Margaret Atwood's "Oryx and Crake" (2013, January 04) Retrieved September 23, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/crake-complexities-in-margaret-atwood-oryx-and-crake-152142/

MLA Format

"Crake's Complexities in Margaret Atwood's "Oryx and Crake"" 04 January 2013. Web. 23 September. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/crake-complexities-in-margaret-atwood-oryx-and-crake-152142/>

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