Art and Seeing Analytical Essay by Research Group

Art and Seeing
This paper compares and contrasts the ways of seeing demonstrated in John Berger's book "Ways of Seeing" and the art works of Barbara Kruger.
# 26480 | 1,321 words | 4 sources | MLA | 2002 | US
Published on May 05, 2003 in Art (Artists) , English (Analysis) , English (Comparison) , Art (Other Mediums) , Art (General)


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Description:

The writer looks at the art works in Barbara Kruger's retrospective exhibition at the Geffen Contemporary at the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, picking out the similarities and differences in the theories addressed by John Berger in his book. The paper brings examples from the artwork as well as quotes from the book to show where the two types of work overlap and where they diverge.

From the Paper:

"Kruger has said that her work is "about a free-floating terrain of desire and pain" and in works such as this, as the many possible meanings are listed, it becomes clear what she means by this (quoted in Plagens 85). She presents a fairly simple image and text that sounds like a clich?. That is all. All reading 'into' this juxtaposition is done by the viewer. The many possible responses to the basic question of how a body is a battleground show how the viewer is set free by the implied question in the work. The viewer moves across unlimited possibilities and, depending on who s/he is, produces responses that involve pain or desire or some combination of the two. Kruger essentially aids the viewer in looking at how s/he sees the world. By presenting an unusual combination she gives the viewer access to fresh ways of seeing--including the ability to understand how s/he looks at things and what influences make him/her produce a particular response to images."

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APA Format

Art and Seeing (2003, May 05) Retrieved January 18, 2021, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/art-and-seeing-26480/

MLA Format

"Art and Seeing" 05 May 2003. Web. 18 January. 2021. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/art-and-seeing-26480/>

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