A Fitting End for Coriolanus Analytical Essay

A Fitting End for Coriolanus
This paper argues that the way Coriolanus is portrayed in Shakespeare's "Coriolanus" explains why he must be murdered.
# 112226 | 1,537 words | 0 sources | 2009 | US


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Description:

The paper explains how the character of Coriolanus, in Shakespeare's play of the same name, is the symbol of virtue in Shakespeare's work and therefore his murder at the end of the play is a fitting end. The paper argues that the manner in which Coriolanus is murdered shows the intentions of Shakespeare to demonstrate that politics is dominated by those driven toward glory and with excessive political ambition; it is not a place for the virtuous.

From the Paper:

"In Shakespeare's Coriolanus, we see Coriolanus as the man of true virtue. This portrayal of the Roman general greatly factors into his demise in the conclusion of the play. We see Coriolanus as a great general who is willing to risk his life for his homeland. He is a god among men; however, he refuses to take praise and moves away from the pursuit of glory. The way Shakespeare shows us Coriolanus in his play gives us some ideas about how and why he must be murdered in the end of the play. There are two major reasons for why Coriolanus' character must meet his end in the fashion that he does, both of which are set up though out the play. The first has to do with the way in which we see Coriolanus in the eyes of the patricians in Rome and Tullus Aufidius in Volsce. The second has to do with the character of his mother who plays an important role in the duration of the play. The attitudes and characteristics of the characters in Coriolanus and the character of Coriolanus himself provide for a fitting end to Coriolanus' life."

Cite this Analytical Essay:

APA Format

A Fitting End for Coriolanus (2009, February 17) Retrieved August 20, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/a-fitting-end-for-coriolanus-112226/

MLA Format

"A Fitting End for Coriolanus" 17 February 2009. Web. 20 August. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/analytical-essay/a-fitting-end-for-coriolanus-112226/>

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