International Relations, Conflict, and Political Activism Admission Essay by Charles056

International Relations, Conflict, and Political Activism
A review of "Washington Rules: America's Path to Permanent War" by Andrew Bacevich, "The Politics of Exile" by Elizabeth Dauphinee, and "God's Century: Resurgent Religion and Global Politics" by Monica Duffy Toft, Daniel Philpott, and Timothy Samuel Shah.
# 154052 | 2,079 words | 7 sources | 2014 | CA


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From the Paper:

"With the rate of globalization or a global culture on the rise, international politics is becoming increasingly important as well. Three books - Washington Rules: America's Path to Permanent War by Andrew Bacevich, The Politics of Exile by Elizabeth Dauphinee, and God's Century: Resurgent Religion and Global Politics by Monica Duffy Toft, Daniel Philpott, and Timothy Samuel Shah - are reviewed, compared, and contrasted in this book review. Though they cover a wide variety of material, experiences, and cultures, these three books are all interconnected as they fall under the subject of global politics and international relations. All three books discuss war, human rights, and political activism; all important topics in the realm of international relations.Commonalities like these will be discussed, as well as the contradictory or conflicting statements or themes with regards to the literature. Finally, the subjective or objective nature of the literature is discusses, as well as a critique on which is more appropriate or effective. This comparative review concludes that the commonalities among these books are hotly debated topics in global politics and that each book presents an overlooked problem or alternative point of view.
"In Washington Rules: America's Path to Permanent War, Andrew Bacevich mainly discusses the foreign policy of the United States from around the time of the First World War. The main argument being stressed is that the United States' conventional foreign policy is based on wartimes, and recent political administrations (George W. Bush's and more importantly, Barack Obama's) have failed to alter this policy to adjust to a time of peace. This form of foreign policy no longer serves American interests, yet it is so entrenched within United States politics, culture, and economics, that the country remains in a permanent state of war. Bacevich argues that the United States sees itself as the only state who can organize the world, which includes dictating which principles and values are right and wrong (and if you reject these principles you are considered rogue or radical). The author is interested in the ability of this matter of foreign relations to maintain presence in Washington despite failures in places like Vietnam and Iraq, stating that counterinsurgency has become the new doctrine to preserve the "Washington Rules" or conventional foreign policy. This has resulted in the ability for American military forces to leave places like Vietnam and Iraq without admitting defeat, and therefore preserving the "Washington Rules.""

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International Relations, Conflict, and Political Activism (2014, October 26) Retrieved September 23, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/admission-essay/international-relations-conflict-and-political-activism-154052/

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"International Relations, Conflict, and Political Activism" 26 October 2014. Web. 23 September. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/admission-essay/international-relations-conflict-and-political-activism-154052/>

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