Soil Contamination and Bioremediation Research Paper by scribbler

Soil Contamination and Bioremediation
An examination of the soil remediation of chemical spills together with bioremediation processes.
# 152199 | 2,439 words | 24 sources | MLA | 2013 | US
Published on Jan 11, 2013 in Environmental Studies (General)


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Description:

This paper examines how chemical spills are a problem of modern society and how the contamination of water and land is of chief concern to scientists developing methods to remediate chemical spills. The paper also looks at how soil remediation is both an area that falls under the scientific rubric, as well as the policy realm. The paper further discusses how soil has always played an important role in the development of mankind and how human activity has disrupted soil formation and with population increasing the pressures we put on soil will undoubtedly rise as well. The paper approaches the issue of soil remediation of chemical spills through an exploration of the the use of bioremediation processes. In particular, the paper focuses on the use of enzymes and bacteria in cleaning up chemical spills in soil.

Outline:
Abstract
Introduction
Use of Chemicals and Problem of Contamination
Sources of Soil Contamination
Methods of Soil Contamination
History of Soil Remediation
Bioremediation Processes
Bioremediation: How it Works
Conclusion

From the Paper:

"Enzymes and bacteria use less energy than chemical processes of soil remediation. They operate effectively at lower temperatures, and they are biodegradable (Crawford and Crawford). The proper mix of temperature, fertilizers, and oxygen must be present in the oil in order for a microorganism to provide enzymes. With these conditions, microorganisms can multiply, thereby supplying more enzymes for the soil remediation process (Dasappa and Loehr). However, when the necessary conditions are not conducive to growth, a backlash effect can occur. With timely and attentive human inputs, the conditions can be manipulated to provide for the most favorable growing environment for the microbes to work (Alcalde, Ferrer and Plou).
"The contaminant must first enter the microbe, by going through the outer cell wall and through the inner cell cytoplasmic membrane. Enzymes within the organism will break down the contaminant, and make it available for the digestive process of the microorganism. However, this diffusion process is not efficient. Humans can extract the enzymes from the cell, and apply them directly to the contaminated soil. This is timely, efficient, and it works (BioTech Solutions Corporation).
"

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Alcalde, Miguel, et al. "Environmental biocatalysis: from remediation with enzymes to novel green processes." Trends in Biotechnology (2006): 281-287.
  • Barnette, Matt, et al. WINTER ROAD PROGRESSIVE SOIL REMEDIATION IN THE SUB-ARCTIC, ABANDONMENT AND RECLAMATION PLANNING AND THE WINTER ROAD ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (WREMS. White Paper - Technical Report. Toronto: EBA Engineering Consultants, Ltd., 2009.
  • Bento, Fatima, et al. "Comparative bioremediation of soils contaminated with diesel oil by natural attenuation, biostimulation and bioaugmentation." Bioresource Technology (2005): 1049-1055.
  • Benyahia, F, et al. "Bioremediation of Crude Oil Contaminated Soils: A Black Art or an Engineering Challenge?" Process Safety and Environmental Protection (2005): 364-370.
  • BioTech Solutions Corporation. BioTech Solutions Corporation: BioChemistry; What is It and Why Is It Important. 12 2 2010. 20 April 2010 <http://biotechsolutionscorp.com/images/Chemis1.jpg>.

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

Soil Contamination and Bioremediation (2013, January 11) Retrieved November 22, 2014, from http://www.academon.com/research-paper/soil-contamination-and-bioremediation-152199/

MLA Format

"Soil Contamination and Bioremediation" 11 January 2013. Web. 22 November. 2014. <http://www.academon.com/research-paper/soil-contamination-and-bioremediation-152199/>

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